Saturday, August 28, 2021

Trees have deep roots



The cellar, Jackson sighed as he descended moldy steps.  Having worked from attic to cellar, Jackson had just eaten a copious number of brownies Grammy forced on him.  Oh, Jackie!  What an industrial (industrious) little boy you are!  Have another brownie…


After a pot of black coffee and a belly full of brownies, Jackson was galvanized to tackle the dank cellar. The first few boxes were with junk.  Then the third box yielded treasure.

An old camera from long ago era1870s maybe Civil War? Riveted by the tin-type photos carefully labeled with names, Jackson could pick out physical resemblances in his own generation.

Jackson froze when one branch of the family turned and headed to hidden family names, absent from family conversations.  One of the great-great-grandfathers was Amos Lee, a black soldier and his black wife, Martha Lee held a child on her lap…Jackson Lee. 

It was a page turner.  Tin and glass plates led to Seneca tribes in New York and then onto Oneida tribes, some twigs went to the Lakota tribes in the West. 

Well, that’s a hell of a thing…Jackson smiled.   Trees have to have deep roots.

This is a Wed. Words challenge for all bloggers. These were started by Delores who created this as a genre for all to grab.

This one is from 2011? I think. Have you ever been in a root cellar?  We had one, 100 years old.  It wasn't all that secure.


29 comments:

  1. Haven't thought about a root cellar in years. This one looks quite nice compared to the one I remember from my childhood. It survived on the family farm for almost 100 years. Before we had a house with a basement we went there for protection from the tornadoes!

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    1. This photo's cellar seems pretty luxurious compared to our.

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  2. Not heard of a root cellar before.

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  3. Root cellars were quite common in old New Mexico ~ before refrigeration. They are ugly things, but they did keep things cooler, lengthening the freshness of the food stored there (which was mostly sun dried or in jars). Here they are dry, since we generally receive an average of 11 inches per year.

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  4. Almost all houses had root cellars when I was a child. They smelled musty and of course were dark. A lot of times canned foods were stored in them. Apples and potatoes were too. They also doubled as shelters from tornadoes.

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  5. I know of root cellars from my reading but have never been in one.

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    1. It isn't a great experience, unless there are all sorts of interesting junk.

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  6. In St. Louis a lot of the older homes had root cellars under the front porch with access from the basement. The article quotes the need for 32 - 40 degrees. I don't know if that would be possible anywhere since caves are typically 55 degrees.

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  7. Nope, I grew up in California, so nothing like a root cellar in my past.

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    1. No cellars in CA, earthquakes take them out.

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  8. No root cellars just basements. Growing up we didn't have a basement or a root cellar and when tornadoes were in the forecast I was always scared! We have a finished basement but one of the storage areas has stones on the floor and we do keep canned goods and such down there. That's about as close to a root cellar as I get!

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  9. Deep and very wide roots on that particular tree. all planned and designed to eventually, maybe, bring forth the genius that will one day save the world.
    I've never been in a root cellar, we don't have them here in Australia.

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  10. We never had a root cellar, but I have been in one several times. Very useful for folks many years ago, not as required today except for BAD WEATHER!
    Jack (thanks for the comments on the shiplog.)

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    1. Root cellars were all around our farm area. Most are disintegrating. I wonder if there are any still used?

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  11. PS: I did enjoy the story also, and yes my family roots take some deep turns....

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    1. We have found all sorts of roots in our family tree.

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  12. Haven't been in a root cellar, and i know very little about our family tree and roots.

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    1. We played in our cellar very little, it was crumbling.

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  13. The story was quite good, but I have NEVER been in a root cellar in my life. Guess I've never seen one, either.

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    1. Most of the ones I remember as a child are gone. Time does that.

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  14. Dear Susan, I'm so glad that I found your blog again and that, once again, I'll get to read your stories and be touched by your imagination which travels far and wee (as e. e. cummins once said). Somehow, I lost your site and found it--after several years--when I saw a comment you'd left elsewhere. It's good to be back as I so admire your creativity. Hope all is well. Peace.

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  15. such a fascinating story dear Susan

    i enjoyed it so much ,you have command over words and expressions i must say as this little paragraph seemed captivating !
    we don't have root cellar here mostly though people with plenty make basements for storage or for servants .

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!