Thursday, June 6, 2019

Rolling down the River

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what can be said?
I grew up between two powerful rivers, the Illinois and Mississippi. Numberous creeks (criks) meandered around towns and farm, all heading to those rivers. Powerful. 

Never underestimate what rivers can do: destroy towns, wipe out fields, wash away forests and trees. We waited every spring for the rain and snowmelt from up north. If all the preparation for such rolling powerful water was adequate, mostly all would be survivable.

But what happens if the levees can't hold back the water? What happens if the flood walls are not quite tall enough? What if. What if.

This year floods have hit many states with horrendous destruction. Here is mine, in Illinois, where my people and towns are.


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Near Florence, IL  We've eaten at this restaurant. Best grilled bologna sandwiches.

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Rte. 100 Grafton, IL City has washed away ?? times. FEMA paid many residents to
relocate to higher ground. Some didn't take the offer. Have driven through Grafton
for years when I was growing up.
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Water level is at 34 ft.

The juncture where Illinois River joins the Mississippi River will cause the water level to rise two more feet in the next few days. Grafton won't survive this much. 

Climate change? I don't know. These two rivers have a history of flooding, but not like this. Back in 1993 when I visited, the flood was historic. Now? New records are being set.

Note: The floods that flowing across plains states will prevent planting crops, raising livestock, etc. Expect costs of food and goods to rise.


43 comments:

  1. Where I live the nearby hills and mountains have always had fire danger and it impacts more people because more people are moving into the hills and onto the mountains and those pretty valleys. So more people are in harm's way.

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    1. New residents apparently have not done their homework.

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  2. You have too much water, we don't have enough...
    It is sad that so many have lost so much though and many insurance companies don't pay up for "Acts of God". Australia does have some flood prone areas but here in my city houses only get flooded when the mains water pipes burst out in the streets. And that's nothing compared to 34 feet of water.

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    1. My brother is near the area (not in danger) and sends me photos on messenger.

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  3. Nature (whether or not her moods owe anything to us) is equally at home in dishing out life and death. We are having far to many 'historic' weather events too.

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  4. I carry with me a childhood trauma of the town's nasty overflowing river. I follow my mom's advice : try as much as possible to live far from a body of water (flooding, tzunami)and forests (fire) - as humans cannot successfully escape from these elements of destruction. Ok, but I live in a zone of military threats. So go figure.

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    1. I am glad your mom gave such good advice. Is there any event that isn't dangerous.

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  5. It's scary how bad the flooding is - Oklahoma and Arkansas are also a mess. We've had some near historic flooding the past few years from hurricanes. Water is very destructive.

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    1. My students did not see water having so much power. Then, two 9 yr. old boys were washed away when they tried to bicycle through a flowing 2 ft deep covering a street.

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  6. The destruction left behind by floods just sicken me. I've never personally been in a flood and I hope to never be.

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    1. Even when the not-flooded areas near us, the ground was saturated and affected septic systems. My parents had their basement flooded with sewage twice.

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  7. I don’t remember having so many weather disasters when I was young. Twenty something years ago a tornado went thru our town killing a family. We had never experienced one before and always thought that these were something that happened in the Midwest and south. Tornado watches, warnings, and touchdowns are now common occurrences. In the past two weeks, I have spent many evenings hunkered down in my basement, very frightened by the sounds of the storms outside. We were lucky but others nearby weren’t. Thankfully, nobody died but there was lots of damage. I am hearing there are more to come later in the week.

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    1. Thankfully we never had tornado scares living between bluffs, but when my parents were old, their house in the new town did.

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  8. The planet is doing its level best to shrug off those parasites known as humans before they completely destroy her. I hope it's not too late for us to change our ways and save not only the planet but ourselves..

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    1. I don't know about that, but it is true that we all do need to change what we can: recycling plastic (really important!), conserving where we can.

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  9. Susan:
    While I'm not buying into climate change (as it's being sold to us - "our fault") for any of these weather conditions, which include tornadoes as well as flooding, there is the possibility that the Earth has changed it's axial "tilt".
    It's called Milankovitch Cycles. Look it up.
    Such cycles WILL cause climate change, but to tell everyone that it's nothing they can do anything about would do more harm than good.
    Mankind has a lot less to do with it than many believe.
    (this is aside from solar activity that impacts our megnetosphere)
    It's just what I've read...proven science.
    Farmers are having a really hard time this season with planting crops.
    I know it seems in Indiana, we've developed a "rainy season"...much like SE Asia.
    Very strange.

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    1. I just read an article from a science journal. Milankovitch Cycles are real.

      Also, on Wikipedia, Axil Tilt is also a cause of changes. Research and finding out info is important to understanding the causes of the unusual events.

      Thanks, Bob. I truly appreciate your input.

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  10. I live on the Missouri River side of Iowa. I am less than 1/2 mile from the Big Sioux River. Fields across the highway from me have been full of water for months. I know that in recent history it has been more flooded but not for so long a time.

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    1. Big Sioux, Missouri, Platt--their floods are not unusual at all. You are correct about having the water staying on land for so long.

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  11. I haven't seen a real flood, and I hope I never do.

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    1. I hope you never do. It is scary to see the creeks cover up freshly planted fields.
      My impulsive brother Bill and a friend built a raft with the intention of heading to Mississippi and go to New Orleans. they got stuck in a field and a neighbor had to rescue them in a row boat.

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  12. It's unbelievable what you see on TV. So many people are affected and I wonder what they do, where do they go, how can they ever recover?

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    1. I honestly do not know. My dad ended up planting a quick growing crops.

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  13. The photos above will now show those buildings under water. I could put up more photos, but there really is no need. Grafton is now completely flooded.

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  14. I heard the other day that if farmers can't get a crop in by June 20th, they can't get insurance for the loss. Yeah, that seems fair...

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    1. Being a farmer is so hard; it is more than a job, it is part of their family. too much rain, no crop. too little rain, no crop.

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  15. It's a trade-off. Our house sits high and dry, the only disadvantage of local flooding is needing a different route around the flooded bridges. However, sitting high during tornado weather is more troublesome. I'm glad we have a basement with a concrete-walled safe room. Still, a tornado could wipe that out of existence if conditions were right (WRONG for us!).

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  16. Replies
    1. Unless one has watched the water rise and then roll--it is scary stuff.

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  17. What a terrible thing a FLOOD/FLOODING. But I must say I do appreciated the post. Many of us think we have seen flooding i.e. a 'crik' of river out of it's banks. BUT the devastation of real floods is apparent with your entry. You also brought up a great subject for comments, I do appreciate reading all of them, especially Bob's comment. I appreciate learning something new. Your post has did that. Thanks lady!
    Sherry & jack

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    1. thanks, Jack. Bob 's comment was great, it was informative. You are correct.

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  18. The floods are freaking me out too and I don't even live near them. Climate change or something else, it doesn't matter -- it's still tragic.

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  19. I read today is the last planting day on record for our grain states, from Dakotas down and across to Ohio. As I looked at the map, I realized I could name all the states in the same order as Mrs. Peters taught them to us, and that was a lot of people without income this year.

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    1. That is so true.

      Mrs. Peters must have been a good teacher, that you could remember that after all these decades.

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  20. Tragic, all the people who lose everything. It must be devastating. My partner runs a big travel company, and they see first hand the results of global warming.

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  21. Hurricanes and flooding are common here. After the last flood, the amount of work to muck out the houses and rebuild was tremendous, and it's not over yet. My heart aches for anyone who is harmed by weather/earthquake/fire.

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    1. Long after the flood, recovery takes forever. All that was part of a lifetime is washed away.

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  22. Hi Susan - I've seen other information about these flooded lands - flooding is awful ... so often man has altered the flood levels - not allowing suitable run-off for the one off rainfall amounts that occur. Just desperate for people who live there and rely on the land ... I hope things work out - all the best - Hilary

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    1. The floods have receded somewhat. So many towns have been flooded, buildings washed away.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!