Saturday, April 23, 2011

T is for...

Time.  We all moan about not having enough of time.  I used to tell my children that they had too much time on their hands if they were getting into fights.  My husband always has big plans for projects he will do over the weekend, but on Sunday night, we look at each other and ask, “Where did the time go?”

That is the big question of the day:  Where did the time go?

It is not as though it slipped behind the bookcase, or joined the lost remote in the sofa cushions.  It certainly isn’t hiding with the iPod, which my husband has AGAIN misplaced!  Time seems to run away from us, like a small child who has just discovered he can outrun his parents.

Time is a fire in which we all burn.
In “Star Trek: Generations” with Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean Luc Picard (sighJ), he is confronted by Dr. Tolian Soran, played by Malcolm McDowell, who says, “Time is the fire in which we all burn.”  Picard has just learned that his brother and nephew have perished in a fire, and this statement hits him rather brutally. 

Is Dr. Soran correct?  Is this the view that most people accept? 

I don’t believe, or can’t believe that it is. 

Time is the ticking of some form of clock, to be sure, but it is also an accumulation of life experiences, memories, events, and closely held loved ones.  Time is a steady revolution of the earth around the sun, a myriad of glorious sunrises and sunsets, the rushing of the foamy tides.  Time is holding the hand of my husband on our wedding day, and still holding his hand when we are old. 

Jean Luc Picard, at the end of the movie when all action is said and done, concludes that time is much like an old friend who moves along slowly with us through our life time.  I really like that conclusion.  “Do not go gentle into that good night!  Rage, rage, against the dying of the light!”  as proposed by the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas is certainly an option.  But, as for me, knowing that the closing of my eyes as a mortal being, and the opening of them to behold God for all eternity, I prefer that measurement of time.  

11 comments:

  1. We need to make the most of the time that we have. "To everything there is a season and time for every purpose under heaven..." (the Book of Ecclesiastes.)

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  2. Great images of time...a fire..an old friend. I think of time as an artificial measurement of the passing of our lives.
    All things are and will be
    and we
    just passing through
    count off our days til they be done
    and start again anew.

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  3. Wow - great post. Especially loved the holding your husbands hand part and the Star Trek tie-ins.

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  4. A beautiful post that soothed my soul after a very hectic week - thank you! There's an award waiting for you over at Daily Dodo. Have a lovely weekend
    Laura x

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  5. Loved your version of time......that was my word also.

    Yvonne.

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  6. Simply beautiful, Susan...Happy Easter!

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  7. Time is a steady revolution of the earth around the sun, a myriad of glorious sunrises and sunsets, the rushing of the foamy tides. Time is holding the hand of my husband on our wedding day, and still holding his hand when we are old.
    Beautifully written!

    Hope you had a joyous Easter Sunday!

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  8. Great post! I don't like the Star Trek view. I do like the way you described it :-)

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  9. Time is one of our most precious earthly commodities and yet one of the most taken for granted. I do like your measurement of time as eternity with God.


    Hope you join us in the Blogging from A to Z Challenge Reflections Mega Post on Monday May 2nd.
    Lee

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  10. That is one of my favorite poems.
    In the 70's miniseries Elizabeth R, Queen Elizabeth bemoans time, like a dead child in her womb. It has always struck me that the passage of time forces us to consider the opportunity cost of every minute.

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