Monday, October 20, 2014

How old are you, Tree?


The tree is very green, but my editing skills somehow added a yellow tinge.  Oh, well.

To call the tree "old" would be inadequate.  Seemingly, the pine had survived decades and had been old even when Jenny was of age to notice it.  Mama, is that tree old?...Yes, it is old….How old?...It has been here since I was your age.

Tree stood tall, as farm houses were new and when farm houses fell apart.  Roads were built, children played around Tree, horses gave way to cars.

Locals knew it had been struck by lightening, suffering fire, but the rain left it to sizzle. 


As she grew and gazed at the passing landscape on the school bus, Jenny looked for Tree, anticipating it. ...around this curve...across this bridge...by Green's farm...up the rise..  From the top of that rise, the tree suddenly appeared and every time it took her breath away.

This tree was made for climbing, but sadly not for me at this stage.

Fifty-five years later, Jenny returned to the tree and finally climbed up the shallow drainage ditch to stand it the tree’s trunk, looking up into its branches reaching to the sun.

 How old are you, tree? She wondered.

Old, it answered.

S

County Hwy 7, Pike County, Nebo-Pittsfield road, Illinois
Long.-90.781594
Lat. 39.41907
Not entirely accurate
I would not bet the family farm on
this .





***This is its Google Map 3D Location:




24 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. There is no other tree like this one in the area. I wish I knew what kind of fir tree it is.

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  2. I bet you could still climb it, just use a ladder lol

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    Replies
    1. If there were a ladder and some safety harness, then maybe I would give it a shot.

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  3. I love this. If trees could tell stories, just think of the stories that they'd tell...

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    Replies
    1. ...and this tree has seen a world of changes.

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  4. Trees live so long. They don't actually die, either. Something has to actually kill it.

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    Replies
    1. So far, so good. I hope to travel back its way someday.

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  5. Replies
    1. This one has towered over the valley for so long, and I would say that it has seen many changes.

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  6. I know exactly how you feel about that tree. She is part of your life, she is important, she must always be there, and please God, keep her safe.

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    Replies
    1. I will ask my brother to drive down and check on her. I hope it has survived another year.

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  7. It's a beautiful, beautiful tree. It's still there, right?
    I love trees, but those that have survived many decades are extra special.

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  8. Trees. So evocative. Always make me think, and dream. How can anyone just pass them by? A lovely post. x

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    Replies
    1. We are both Tree-people, then. A tree like this must surely stop other people, like myself.

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  9. Old is good, especially when it comes to trees. They certainly can be majestic. We've got quite a few huge, old trees on our land and I love them so. :)

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    Replies
    1. Our first visit to Sequoia Nat'l Park left us speechless.

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  10. Maybe one of you writers could write the history of a tree.

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    Replies
    1. Now that would be interesting, but very exacting and exhausting.

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  11. The wisdom to be told by the tree. Yes, well thought out, dear Susan. A treemendous post that could easily branch out into all sorts of possibilities. I Pine for such stories.

    Thank you for this and yes, it really is me, Penny's alleged human, Gary :)

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    Replies
    1. You're BACK! Hurray!! Good plays on the words, Gary.
      It would be an interesting group of stories, kinda like James Michelin and The Source.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!