Thursday, October 23, 2014

Wednesday Words: Utopia

That New Utopia Show Is a Dumb Dystopia But Obviously That's the Point
It is a TV Reality Show!
Utopia…Utopia… Just thinking that word sent chills through Sir Edward St. James, as the steam engine carried him to the place of his dreams: Utopia. He smiled smugly, straightening his necktie, recalling how he obtained funds for this great venture.  After all, a little plagiarism to boost sales on my latest book should not surprise anyone these days.

The ideal society where logic and elevated thought processes was Sir Edward’s expectation.  A gleaming white hall with pillars would be filled with men of his class and intelligence, sharing discourse with the great thinkers of the 19th century.
The Great Awakening

As the train nudged to a stop, whistle sounding, Sir Edward settled his silk top hat and valise, preparing to step out into the 1872 version of heaven.  Not only did an intellectual paradise wait for him, but a mail order bride as well.  Cynthia Brighten was a devout spinster who would fulfill his selfish needs and do laundry.

Stepping out onto the platform, Sir James was immediately seized and squeezed tightly by an obese homely woman who covered his face with sloppy kisses. Cynthia?  Oh God please noooo…

Before he could pull away from the passionate woman, Sir James gazed in horror at what was the real Utopia.  A white crude wooden barn-like structure dominated the center of the town, and was surrounded by muddy streets. Fellow Utopians stomped through the muddy streets in their elegant finery, struggling to discuss Descartes and anything else except the hellish Utopia and its damn mud.

new_harmony.jpg
New Harmony, Indiana, 1831
 Sir Edward’s automatic response to this horror was to ask, “I would like a ticket back to Philadelphia, one way, for one person.  Immediately.”

Many thanks go to Delores at Under the Porch Light for her dedication in stumping all participants in "Wednesday Words".  Delores provides six words for writers to shape into poetry, prose, story, flash fiction... You will find some excellent contributions at her site above.  If you would like to jump in, please click on the Methodist Church in the right site bar.



16 comments:

  1. One mans misery is another's Utopia...I think he got what he deserved lol.

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    1. So do I...selfish man. This apparently was a big movement in the 19th century, most of which did not succeed.

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  2. A one-way ticket is the only way to "get outta Dodge."

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    1. I wondered when the train would leave.

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  3. Best to leave quickly, lest presence alone lead to more situations of grief. ;)

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    1. I feel sorry for poor Cynthia. I think she need to go West.

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  4. Get out of there stat when Utopia turns out to be a trap.

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    1. I cannot imagine anyone thinking that a Utopia would be as he imagined. they would starve to death.

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  5. I love it! And really laughed out loud... doing that always feels great! Thank you for sharing Utopia with all of us!

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    1. Aren't you glad you did not head out to join one? In the 1960s, they were called "Communes".

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  6. I was interested with the combination of the story about "Utopia" and a picture of John Wesley preaching. (I was leading worship for our congregation this past Sunday, and focused on Wesley's assumption that the Christian faith could — and did — change peoples lives.) The question for me, would I prefer Utopia or Wesley?

    I'd take Wesley any day.

    Blessings and Bear hugs, Susan! Best regards to the Cat.

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    1. Wesley, absolutely. He changed America with his songs, writing, and preaching.

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  7. Now this would make a much better reality show! I hope Cynthia found another man who appreciated her laundress skills! Very clever!

    Julie

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    1. Good luck and God bless her! She has a big,giving heart, and Sir James did not deserve her.

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  8. Too often expectation does not match reality. I feel sorry for Cynthia, she gets disappointment and desertion.

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    1. I suspect Cynthia has had a loveless life and deserves so much more. I think she should head for the Western Wilderness, staying on the Bride list. A rancher/farmer would appreciate a hard-working woman.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!