Monday, January 16, 2012

Drama of Life



In looking for something, I found treasures…I think I have used that phrase before...anyway...

Well, not treasures exactly.  Journals from years ago, I found my journals. 

At times throughout life, I have kept one or more journals at any given time.  They would be filled with everything—a record of good and bad events, thoughts, and concerns.


In my childhood, there was nothing print-worthy happening in my opinion, so my journals-diaries were little snippets of drama.  A verruca wart on my foot was exaggerated to be a crippling illness.  That would then morph into life threatening.  To make the diary appear even more dramatic, I dribbled some cologne water over entries to create tear smears.  Oh, I was big on drama as a child, my father always maintained.

Drama must be part of life in one shape or another.  Falling in love, getting married, childbirth—those are darned dramatic.  I have photos to prove it!

But, the little dramas, the ones that are interspersed on a daily basis?  Now, those are the stuff of life. 

Losing one’s car keys?  Not drama.  Standing in line at Starbuck’s behind an elderly couple holding hands?  That’s drama.  Their whole life was played out before me in simple gestures, soft looks, few words, and even their order. 

She had “…the decaf coffee with vanilla syrup…not too much, now…and room for creamer…”  He had the “…full-strength stuff, and …NO, I will not have decaf instead….”  See?  There lays a whole one act play, filled to the brim with drama, leaving a little room for cream:  “…leave room for cream…you have real cream, dontcha? Not that fake stuff they call creamer…”

See what I mean?  Real drama.  I wanted to follow them to a table, but my order was ‘to go’.  Who knows what I missed? 

Those journals will have months!  months, I tell you, of future postings.  I can feel the drama vibrating through the cardboard covers.

15 comments:

  1. You have to make the most of everything...embellish every moment.

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    1. That is the truth--find the zest in the small moments. The big moments take care of themselves.

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  2. Dear Susan,
    I so look forward to one day reading in your post that you are working on a book about your family and the town--is it Pleasant Hill?--sorry that I can't remember for sure--where you all lived. With your vivid imagination and sense of drama and suspense, you could write plays or novels or short stories. What ever you write, however, it will be a gift to a Universe and to all of us gathered at One in it. You are truly gifted.

    Peace.

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    1. I have boxes of mini-plays, church dramas, short stories written on my old manual typewriter. I look forward to getting "In Preacher's Creek" out there.

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  3. Dear Susan,
    I visited your other blog to check and discovered that I had the "P" right but that the town is "Preacher's Creek." That name in itself resounds in the mind.

    Peace.

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    1. Wow: Was it a Hemingway short story which read:
      'For Sale, Wedding dress, never worn.'?

      This little gem you have given us is right up there. My mind is creating the story line as I type. Thank you for noticing this couple, and thank you for sharing it.

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    2. Let me know what story line comes from your very creative brain!!
      Hemingway was a word-master, for sure.

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  4. I used to make entire novels in my head, and recite parts--but never wrote them down. Looking forward to your stories.

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    1. The key thing is to write them down. I have always surrounded myself with paper, jotting stuff down here and there.
      When my brother Bill died at the age of 44 in 1999, I was dropped to the bottom of a deep well. I began writing this book "In Preacher's Creek" in 2000 as a way to grieve, to focus creativity. It morphed over the years. Now I must do something with it.

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  5. I agree. It's the little things in life that matter.

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    1. The moments make up the hours...and it is the moments we treasure the most.

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  6. This was not their first marriage. They met at a senior center, one was divorced and the other widowed. It was sparks right away and they felt and acted like they were sixteen years old again . They married quickly, as they had no time to waste. After a few months, she noticed changes. He had moments of confusion, and would sometimes call her by a different name. She knew the signs as she had been through this before with her other husbands (1, 2, and 3). The arsenic was working, and it was only a matter of time now.

    What, you wanted romance?

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    1. This was perfect, esp. the arsenic and the previous husbands. They must have had good insurance.

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  7. I love seeing those older couples who still hold hands. I'm always fascinated. And so cool about the journals. A couple of years ago I went thru a lot of my teenage/early college years journals and wow! What a trip down memory lane. I always saved them thinking my distant fam would wanna read them after I'm gone.... BUT after reading them, now I wonder if I shouldnt just toss them. So much personal stuff should be kept that way. Perhaps my feelings will change in another ten years or so ....

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  8. I Bet you were the most lovable, ADORABLE child :0)

    Aren't journals such a gift as time goes on ;)

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!