Monday, March 30, 2015

Gasping at the Art of Trees


A love of trees stops me dead in my tracks.  Trees of all sorts (except palm trees which do nothing at all except to look tropical) have an angular beauty that leads the eyes up to sky.  Their roots dig deep into the ground, occasionally emerging here and there.


Only recently I stood on a mass of tangled, twisted roots which caught 
my breath, took it away.  The tree is a Fig Tree at St. Peter's Catholic Church in Fallbrook, California.  Here are some photos.







I hope you gasp.

The Moreton Bay Fig Tree was brought to California by an Australian seaman who gave it to a girl, who then planted it. It was originally planted in 1876 up in Santa Barbara area, and then replanted in a warmer spot. Moreton Bay is the source of the seed.  Now these trees are appreciated by all who see them, and are protected.  The tree's canopy is about 198 feet across, the height is 200 ft. or more, and the trunk circumference is about 42 feet.  The observable roots are roughly the same as the tree's canopy. They are a form of banyon trees.  Look again: Take another gasp.  Source of infor
Limb
What's that kid doing up there?!!
This fig tree was used in Jurassic Park 1.

p.s. Balboa Park has one spectacular tree, which is now protected with a chain fence to prevent field trip children from climbing on it.

23 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh, what a tree. It looks like it could give shade to a small village.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, that is one tree that will surely stop and make you look

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think I would spend the whole day beneath those branches.

      Delete
  3. The tales this tree could tell...Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True--there are trees that are almost 2,000 years or more here in California. Yosemite, Big Sur...There is a species of white pine that have grown into cracks of boulders, that look dead (aren't), and are estimated to be close to 5,000 years or more. Dang. I'll have to look that up!

      Delete
  4. I am also a tree hugger. Literally occasionally, metaphorically often.
    So much beauty. So much tenacity. So much wisdom I would love to tap into...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Okay, I got curious about the reply I wrote to Gail. In the White Mountains in Inyo County, easter CA, there are Ancient Bristlecone Pines. One pine is called "Methusaluh" as it is over 4,000 years old. Another tree was recently discovered which is 5,064 yrs., germinating in 3051 BC. Trees...tenacious and tremendous.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow, that is a massive root system. If that's above ground, I wonder how much more runs underground?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good question...this tree totally overwhelmed me.

      Delete
  7. It's everything you say it is. The root system is so impressive. I passed a similar root system on my travels today and made a mental note to go back and investigate. It won't be a fig, I'm sure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If it has had to survive your winter, I don't know what it is. Let me know! post photos.

      Delete
  8. I just find those root systems kind of creepy. Too many nightmares of being buried and inundated with roots coming at me... Sorry, traumatic dreams.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, yes! These roots could conjure some bad dreams. In fact, I think I have seen some movies with that.

      Delete
  9. Oh, that is a beauty! The root network is amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  10. We have many Moreton Bay figs here in Adelaide, I love them. I don't think we have one quite as large as the one you have pictured there, but since I've never measured any of them I can't be sure. If I had property with reasonable acreage, they would definitely be planted there. Along with English Oaks, they're also very wide growing and shady.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I had property and if I had trees like these. I would have one heck of a tree house.

      Delete
  11. Palm Trees have coconuts.;)

    And wow to that root system!! That's amazing. Florida has some great trees with roots going everywhere. Here in Michigan our trees get so tall!!! I'd love to make a trip to the national park that showcases amazingly large trees. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In Illinois when I was young, we had some really old Maple trees, and they towered all the way to the sky. Old age took them down, sadly.
      Here, in California, we have palm tree that are strictly ornamental--no coconuts, no dates. Sadly.

      Delete

Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!