Monday, June 27, 2016

I will read ashes for you, if you ask me.


I will read ashes for you, if you ask me. 
I will look on the fire and tell you from the gray lashes 
And out of the red and black tongues and stripes, 
I will tell how fire comes 
And how fire runs far as the sea.
By Carl Sandburg


Fire all throughout the Southwest--it is burning, eating and consuming every single thing in its way.

from a distance
Residents are looking back at the fire, as they drive away with just clothes and photos.

From YouTube site

Dry dry air, heavy and suffocating.  Sun scorching burnt earth, 100 degrees or more. Tinder dry vegetation, ready to burn.

Oh, God!  Please protect the firefighters!  

Oh, God! Bless families whose homes are burned to the ground!

Every summer, I post about wildfires.  Last year, we could see the flames from our house. One year at a school where I taught, ashes covered playground and swings.

29 comments:

  1. Those fires are really quite horrible. Still people will live in areas that are prone to such fires just like people will continue to live in high potential flood zones. I guess hope of evading disaster outweighs anything that might happen in order to live in areas that can otherwise be beautiful. But it's tragic when the bad things happen.

    Recently on one of the hottest days here in L.A. I looked northward from my house to see the massive plumes of smoke ascending. It was foreboding. Fortunately our are is an unlikely one for fire threats of the nature we see in areas like where the recent fires have been happening. But then we have the threat of earthquake. No one ever knows for sure when disaster will strike wherever they live.

    Yes, pray for the firefighters--they do an amazing job--and for those who have lost their homes.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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    1. I was really surprised by the fires in Canada (Alberta, I think). Where water is in the air all the time, fire is unlikely I thought.
      The last earthquake out in Anza-Borrego was a 5 I think. I felt a jolt and went back to sleep. Here in San Diego, we are off the Rose Fault which starts out in the ocean, but that doesn't mean much.

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  2. Those fires sure can rage on for a long time. Hopefully everyone remains save and sound.

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  3. I so empathize with all who are affected. We went through some pretty bad fires here in Texas during the long five year drought. Lots of property up in flames (I think the total number of acres was the equivalent of Rhode Island) plus we've experienced having a fire too darn close to our house. Scary.

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    1. Being able to see the flames is one of the scariest feelings I have ever had.

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  4. I cannot envision living where fires burn or earthquakes happen. But, I live where tornadoes come through and flood water rise. We must be prepared. And, bless all first responders. They are a different breed.

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    1. Earthquakes, fire,Tornadoes and floods and hurricanes--indescribable in destruction. Really makes me realize that we truly in the hands of God.

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  5. Fires are so intense, so scary. Positive thoughts and energy sent out to all involved.

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    1. People are so vulnerable and disasters happen so quickly.

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  6. We need some rain for sure, where's the el nino they kept talking about?

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    1. Good question...where is the promised rain?

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  7. Fire is a constant fear here in summer. And too many (way too many) are deliberately lit. As well as the humans far too many animals lose their lives or their homes.
    I do hope these fires can be contained. Quickly.

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    1. It is the saddest sight to see pets running away from the fires and horses quickly being hauled away.

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  8. Prayers for everyone in that fire's path. I have huge fear of fire.

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  9. I can't even imagine the unfolding tragedies here. All those affected and working to stop it are included in my prayers.

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    1. I wonder about Inger at Desert Canyon. She cleared weeds and dry tinder around her house and on her land.
      Fire happens so quickly.

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  10. I've been ignoring the wildfires. It hurts too much to think about it.

    I remember one October where it got so hot and we could smell the ash. The air was so bad that the school called six or seven ambulances that day to take away kids who were having asthma issues. (I actually had a girl try to come to class, but she was having so much trouble breathing she had to be held up by her two friends. Yeah, she so didn't need my permission to go to the health office for that!)

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    1. Poor students! I made my students cover their mouth and nose with paper towels. Then I decided wet paper towels were better. You're right...those with asthma really suffered.

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  11. I'm so sorry for all those who have or are, losing everything.
    We have the same trouble here in our summers and I always feel so helpless.

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    1. So very sorry for you and yours in the fire zone. Helpless is the right word.

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  12. So very frightening...as River said we have them here in summer and the lead up to...and we call them "bush fires". Tragic events.

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    1. Terrifying, no matter what a fire is called. I hope you will see no smoke this year.

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  13. We just passed the anniversary of the Waldo Canyon Fire this week. I'm not sure I'll ever reach a time where I don't hold my breath until we move into July, even though fire season is still going strong at that time. Our big fires tend to come in June, for some reason. I watch wild fires in other areas with horror, knowing what the people near them are going through. In fact, I just wrote a horror story about a wildfire survivor who lost her family in a fire. It was something I needed to get out of my system.

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    1. I think I remember when you posted about a wildfire a few years ago. You were in the basement, to be able to breathe smoke free air. Asthma?
      Anyway, we call summer and fall our fire season, since we have a desert climate. I hope you will be safe and fire-free this year.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!