Monday, January 13, 2014

Let's hear it for the....taproot!

Source: one heck of a taproot
The importance of the taproot is underrated.  Sure, carrots and radishes can hold their own in the garden, but what about the other taproots?  The unsung heroes of the lawn and garden?  Or, perhaps, what about the enemy taproots that fight and cling?

Such a strange topic, isn’t it?  This is my challenge for today: finding a topic that is unusual, while having meaning to all who have any sort of garden or lawn.

Many readers have amazing gardens.  Elephant’s Child amazes us with her photos and dedication to the beautiful garden she enjoys.  Gary Pennick’s delightful gnome and fairy grotto combines with some wonderful plants around his abode.  Inger is surrounded by desert growth which dazzles in the winter and spring.

And who can forget Joanne's sunflower at Cup on the Bus?  Talk about a taproot that really digs deep!


Please visit Joanne's site, highlighted above.

Native Americans appreciated the medicinal value of herbal taproots for their healing properties.

So why is the taproot so important?  And, for that matter, what is a taproot?

The taproot is the main root that anchors the plant.  From it dispatches secondary branch roots that seek out water and nutrients, as well as further anchoring the plant.  The taproot is vital to a plant’s survival.

tap-root system
Source
Whenever you are trying to pull a weed from the ground and having a hard time of it, it is the taproot’s fault. You aren't (or may not be) a weakling.  Just don't hurt your back.

There.  If you have read all this blog, then you have become all the more wiser.




28 comments:

  1. And if you don't get all of the nasty taproot that weed you are trying to eradicate will be back shortly.

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  2. You educate as you post. Taproots stand the test of time. Families, especially should have strong taproots.

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    1. Hopefully, those taproots go deep, through many generations.

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  3. I only have one thing to say. Morning glories.

    Another topic: support. That sunflower had a staff.

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    1. Did it!? I bet that thing needed some extra support, without the other sunflowers that normally surround it!

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  4. Is it wrong that I've never heard of taproot?? I need to get out more :)

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  5. Thistles and dandelions have strong taproots. And I agree with Manzanita, families need strong ones.

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    1. Thistles esp. Manzanita is wise, as she is talented.

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  6. Hmm first I've heard of a taproot too, that I can recall.

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    1. You must find a garden somewhere in the summer, and try to pull a mature carrot from the ground. then you will understand.

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  7. Hi Susan,

    I think I've tapped into something with your informative article. My human is most flattered you including his garden amongst those other fine displays of nature's wonders. Thank you and may we all have pawsitive roots.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar!

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    1. It is clear that Penny keeps you rooted and growing. Any root hair would need to be shaved on a daily basis.

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  8. A taproot..., well, that sure is digging deep for a post.

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    1. You know it. Migraines and a blank screen do that to me.

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  9. I never heard of a taproot. I am all into holistic medicine and natural foods.

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    1. I have been reading a book, Healing Secrets of the Native American, by Porter Shimer. I will be writing about a book I found on Wednesday.

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  10. Taproots for weeds could dig for the Olympics. And would win gold every time. And also have the ability to miraculously rejuvenate from a single cell. Super heroes envy them.
    (And thanks for the heads up. The garden is turning into a crispy critter at the moment in our vile heat. Hopefully it has some of the persistence of tap roots.)

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  11. The Olympics, indeed! While you are supposed in your summer, we have skipped over our winter and are heading there ourselves. 80 deg.F today!

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  12. And after living in hurricane country, I can testify that oaks have lousy taproots.

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    1. Some Oaks have roots that stretch out to anchor them that way, and to acquire the most nutrients and water. Palm trees are much the same. I wonder what kind of oak trees you have?

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  13. Taproots have made me happy without me even knowing it. They've also irked me (and I knew it). :)

    Good job w/the topic!

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  14. Wonderful information for those who know not. The feeder root lives and feeds all the plants.

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  15. In the past I tried to pull weeds that were so tough I was convinced the tap roots went two miles into the earth. Now I hack them off at ground level and squirt with roundup. Lo and behold...another grows again not two inches away! Damn weeds.

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  16. hmmm, I have never heard of taproots before... I'll be sure to remember the next time I pull a large weed out of our garden ;)

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  17. That's what I love about blogging, you always learn something new. And I will never look at a weed the same way again. Thanks for mentioning my blog.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!