Thursday, April 16, 2015

N is for Nebo

The irony of Nebo, Illinois, is that while I lived there, I could not wait to leave it.  Now I think about those days, get a wallop of nostalgia, and wish I knew more about the place left behind.

It began as a true log cabin town, growing with each new settler with names of Shaw, Ross, Franklin, and many more.  With each new family the settlement became a township.

When I returned for visits over the years, the town had shrunk just a little bit more and the people I knew had died. Their children left (just as I had), and then there were empty vandalized houses, and people I don’t know.

Basically a ghost town compared to its former self.

Here are photos of the then and now:


Hebo High School, 1920?
Baptist Church, which still looks like this.


C.R. Rodgers' Trans Continental trip for
to promote Vin Fizz soda
Peck house on Pearl-Nebo road


Painted by in-mate at nearby prison

Nebo High School Gym--all that remains
of the High School

Country School Students









Another Nebo, in Wales, 1984



Mt. Nebo, where Moses is buried


N is for Nebo. 
145 words, or thereabouts.

42 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Saving old photos allowed me to look back at what was.

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  2. How very true, about leaving a place. Wish I could bring people back, if not the place. Thanks as ever for your kind support. I'm sure that like myself, when you write something you know you could have done it differently, but I'm improving with each book, as least so it seems.

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  3. I love history. It is sad when a town dies.

    Great pictures.

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    1. It is sad...no one else can ever know what the town looked like, the people shopping there, kids going to school...It happens.

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  4. Seems a lot of small towns are becoming ghost towns. I know the one I grew up in is

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    1. Opportunities took away the men returning after wars, their offspring heading off to college and not to return...Natural process, but still sad.

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  5. It's fun to see the pictures. I couldn't wait to leave my town. I still don't miss it, but I do like to go back to visit. We moved to a place I loved and stayed there 18 years. Now hubby's got me living in another town up north, similar to the one I grew up in, and truthfully though I try not to, I still hate it. But I digress... a lot... with this one. :)

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    1. My parents stayed on the farm until about 1985, then retired. I kept returning to see them, until Dad and Mom died. Nothing to visit now.

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  6. Even though we leave, where we grew up is always home.

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  7. Home is where the heart is. Nice pictures.

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    Replies
    1. Even after the home is torn down and a new home built in its place, I'd still drive by "home" when I was visiting Illinois.

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  8. That's what happens with really small towns sometimes. The kids move away for bigger and better things.

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    Replies
    1. ...and if there is nothing to maintain the town's economy, it is gone.

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  9. Interesting to watch small places change. I think over the change in my small village over the last thirty years and I can tell you all the reasons.

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    Replies
    1. You certainly have a hands-on, shoes-on-the-ground that few could have.

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  10. It is sad when a town that used to be so active has become a virtual ghost town. Everyone moves to the big cities. Later they wish to go back

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    Replies
    1. It is terribly sad, but inevitable in the way life works.

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  11. A log cabin town sounds so cozy. It's sad when small towns turn into ghost towns.

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    Replies
    1. History changes. The log cabins were a temporary commitment to the area. Houses popped up when settlers decided to stay.

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  12. That is so sad that everyone you knew is no longer.

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    Replies
    1. The memory of those people and their kindness will never be forgotten, though. Good people.

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  13. It’s officially the second half of A to Z. Time to catch that second wind, rest up on Sunday, then it’s that mad dash toward the finish line!

    Stephen Tremp
    A to Z Cohost
    N is for Numerology

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    Replies
    1. Midway, are we? Just getting a second wind.

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  14. Theres a place in my heart too for nostalgia, it lingers on, hungering for answers.

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    Replies
    1. I don't know if your town is near enought to visit, or if it is gone altogether? There are photos in boxes, so I can re-capture memories.

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  15. I think I drove through Nebo once, in the little time I lived in Illinois. I haven't been to the place where I grew up in California for ten years. Planning to go this year, and I can only imagine how much it has changed. :)

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    Replies
    1. Did you!?! I hope it showed its best face to you!

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  16. So many stories, drifting in the winds...

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    Replies
    1. Truly. Stories that might someday be gathered with social media.

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  17. I've heard it said, and so have you, that you can never go home again. It's not true. As long as you hold the place and the people in your memory, you can go home whenever you want.

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  18. It's sad how often this happens with small towns. I love the pictures.

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    Replies
    1. Ghost Towns in California have mostly become tourist attractions. People want a connection to the past.

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  19. Sad that people are leaving, but maybe someone might turn it around?

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    Replies
    1. Forty years ago, that might have been possible, but the strength of the community was failing even then.

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  20. "the past is a strange place, you go back, it doesn't recognise you"
    I remember visiting the town I grew up in a couple of years ago. I knew many of the streets, but there were too many new ones and all the buildings were different. The only face I recognised was my sister.

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    Replies
    1. Once my parents moved from the farm to another town, with others their generation, there seemed to be a mass exodus.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!