Saturday, October 19, 2019

My Desert Garden: What the heck are they?

Smithsonian Magazine--sun through smoke
Throughout my early life when we lived on a farm, Mom's garden seemed immense. All five children were involved in some aspect of that garden, until the 3 boys were busy with the livestock. But, my sister and I were out there with hoes, fighting weeds. We were harvesting produce soon after and canning them, my sister and I unwillingly.

Now, here in a desert climate, my garden is really just ornamental plants. Slowly over the past three years, the heat has fried many of those delightful plants. Fried, truly fried is the only way to describe the last year's summer.

Thus, those fried plants have been pulled, replaced with drought and heat resistant succulents.  I do not know what they are, except for the jade plant.  It will be astounding as years pass.

So, given all that info, I would appreciate your help in identifying these plants. I am pathetic, but I know some of you excellent plant people can help me.


This was found in Great-Uncle Patrick Kane's house in Ireland. 

I "threw" this pot.  The other piece is a water bottle
I bought at an English antique fair.

This sat in my Mother-in-law's garden for 40+ years.

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

#6

#7  This is a red clover, basically a shamrock. I keep
in shade, well watered. It blooms now and then.

#8


#9

#10  It is a jade plant, I think.


So, there you have them. Please give this clueless blogger some help. Thanks.

I do have some roses and geraniums, on the side yard, and they are surviving. There is one healthy, a big old rose bush in the corner of the back stretch,  protected from the wind and harsh-unforgiving-sun.


49 comments:

  1. The only one I recognize is the clover and you already know it, LOL!

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    1. Shamrocks were "seamrog'" Ireland. Just read it when I was teaching about Ireland. One boy wanted to test me and asked about shamrock Irish name. I nailed it.

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  2. I thought just for a wild guess I would call the clover a Shamrock, but then you actually said that. I am dumber than a rock about plants but I am proud of you for being honest about participating in gardens and canning growing up! LOL
    Desert plants, I was so shocked at the things growing in the desert when we once decided to hike in the desert some.
    Love from NC where we have rain...
    Sherry & jack

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  3. I am not good on succulents. When River stops by she should be able to help.

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  4. I am not good at raising plants. My mother loved succulents and could raise anything. She always had a garden even in the city. Both my sisters are good with houseplants. I am a sad case. That explains why I can't help you identify your plants.

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  5. My wife and I do some gardening here on Long Island. I do not know much about dessert plants. They do look and sound interesting.

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  6. I ought to know for those are probably all our plants for the future. Will check back to see if anyone knows.

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  7. Did you know solar energy is just nuclear energy at a safe distance?

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    Replies
    1. No, I didn't. My husband has been reading about the sun and its contents.

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  8. I recognise all the plants, but sadly have no idea as to names. Well done with the pot throwing, I studied pottery for a short while and was hopeless! Know what you mean about the garden being fried. My friend in Atlanta is a keen gardener, she produces the sort of garden that makes people stop and stare in admiration, and now it is just a desert.

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    1. It was impressive to see lawns pulled up and laid out with rock and desert plants. Have its own beauty.

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  9. Yeah, I don't know what any of them are called. I know not from plants. But they look familiar. I've seen them around.

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  10. Have you thought about taking the photos to the local plant nursery and asking there?

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  11. I think my mom had something like #3 in a hanging pot on her front porch, and referred to it as "hen and chickens." I'm not plant-literate. The jade plant I know, because I have one that was a gift.

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    1. Jade plants always need to be repotted into a larger pots, or just planted in the ground. We have done both over time. One we had years ago took off like a rocket.

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  12. #1: don't know, a closer look at leaf and flower might help
    #2: miniature chalk sticks, same as mine
    #3: echevaeria, commonly known as hen and chickens and can spread quite widely if conditions are right
    #4: I don't know this one
    #5: aeonium, similar to the green ones I have here
    #6: another aeonium, a long leaf black one similar to my "black prince"
    #7: the clover
    #8: small leaf jade
    #9: an assortment of plants that I don't recognise
    #10: a big leaf jade, similar to mine, if it eventually flowers, the flowers are pink and star shaped. All jades are from the Crassula family and there is quite a variety, I have a curly leaf one that is quite pretty. I've probably shown it before, but I'll take another photo and show it again, I also have something called "Gollum", also a form of Crassula. All of the "jades" can be propagated just by poking a fallen or picked off leaf into a pot, where it may appear to die, but then tiny baby leaves will grow from it, same with a piece of stem.

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    Replies
    1. Whoa, you know your plants! I will put their names on their pots so I can say "Oh, that is a..." and impress my gr-kids.

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  13. You could also try "Donkey Tails' in a hanging pot. Almost all succulents can be propagated the same as the jades, so if you have something that does well, just break off a piece and repot it.

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  14. I know nothing about plants, but they all like lovely and green! Haha. Glad River above me knows so much!

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    Replies
    1. It is always good to have someone who knows stuff in your circle of friends.

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  15. haha well I'm an instant fail today.

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    1. Since that never happens with you, I will overlook this one.

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  16. … and my IGNORANCE makes 3. Love the pots, however!
    Aren't you glad I resisted the urge to ask if you were trying to grow FRIED green tomatoes? (Ha - I didn't!)

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  17. Beautiful succulents. I've seen them all, but only knew the name of #3, like several other people. However, you picked some beauties to grow in your harsh dry landscape.

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    1. Picking them out was just a matter of walking past other residents who know what they are doing.

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  18. Those succulents do look beautiful.

    I'm not too good at plants, but I can see from comments above some bloggers are.
    If there are any not identified perhaps you could take the photographs to a garden centre or nursery, they should be able to help you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. I printed up the photos, will go to Lowe's and see what they say. With succulents, they are most forgiving. try one.

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  19. I'm no pro but number 5 looks like 'hens and chicks" and I thought number 9 had some 'donkeys tail' in it.

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    1. I will see what a nursery says about them. I have received so many guesses!

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  20. Wow. This is so cool plant. I need this as my indoor plants. Thanks for sharing by the way.
    Try to check this too
    DogsNStuff.net

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  21. I'm the worst person to ask this! I have NO idea but I like them and hope they weather well!

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  22. River sure knows her plants. I usually try and save the little id signs that comes with the plants but sometimes they can get lost. Good luck with getting the other ones identified at Lowe's.

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    1. That is what I shall do, and I will also put little signs by them.

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  23. The first photo looks like a wine container rather than a plant. I suspect it is from a merchant called Thomas Plunkett. I can't recognise the others.

    God bless.

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    1. It is a whisky jug, I think. Thomas Plunkett--good eyes, Victor.

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  24. We once had a monster Jade plant. We somehow killed it.
    We are both good with plants so I’m not sure how it happened, but it did.
    My nephew is a potter and he makes beautiful pieces that are works of art.

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  25. Also, I can’t find a follow by email link that lets me know when you post. Am I missing it?
    R

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  26. Hi Susan - excellent I see you've lots of help especially from River ... just enjoy whatever springs up - after all weeds are plants in the wrong place ... cheers Hilary

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!