Friday, January 14, 2022

Valley of the Cheese of the Dead

 


 


ssws.jpg  Notice what is printed on the wheel


 Many tourist destinations are popular, overly popular.  When visiting our daughter in Switzerland, we have tried to peer over and around parked tour buses that covered the Alps with vehicles and people.  

But, then, there are other places that would be a surprise all around:  

The Valley of the Cheese of the Dead 

There is no way to describe this village and how honored cheese is. To make it more important, one can have their own cheese that started aging the early part of one's life, then being allowed to continue to age over someone's lifetime. 

 " Zufferey’s home, high in the Swiss mountains of Val d’Anniviers, is one of the last places you’ll find evidence of this peculiar practice—of keeping a wheel of cheese to be eaten at your funeral."

Displaying or discussing this practice, the village, the people, and huge wheels of aged cheese that will be served at your funeral, is impossible to do more than to tell you to visit this site, dedicated to cheese for the dead.


The village of St Luc and the Val d'Anniviers, Valais, Switzerland. 

 Old wheels are stacked on their sides. Since they're completely firm, they won't lose their shape.

 Wheels are resting in a cave, which probably has some very ancient cheeses.

This wheel of cheese was likely a lot larger 149 years ago, but has shriveled due to moisture loss.

149 years old



Ask yourself: Would I do this? Would living with this tradition give your life any more significance? No, probably not. But it would be so cool.

And you thought that Camembert or brie were among the best cheeses going. Ha.

                    sdds.jpg

Would you think this sleepy, red geranium lined street was a part of the Valley of the Cheese of the Dead?
 

42 comments:

  1. Undoubtedly the weirdest tradition I’ve ever heard of! Are these cheeses actually edible after 80 years? I’ve heard of aged cheese, but that’s taking it kind of far.

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  2. Nothing surprises me about the Swiss. They are a patient people.

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  3. If it ages well, i guess that means the longer you live, the better your cheese tastes by the time family and friends get to sample it.

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    1. Hmm. That is a thought. It would make an interesting book.

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  4. That is fascinating. I don't know if I'd want a cheese saved to be served at my funeral. I'm not a big cheese person. (And I imagine my funeral won't be very well attended. Might not even bother to hold one, I'd imagine.)

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  5. That's a very interesting tradition. I wonder what a cheese would taste like after all those years.

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  6. What an interesting tradition. The street looks lovely too.

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  7. Interesting. But you'll never get rich starting a business like that. You'd be dead before any of you customers.

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    1. there would be too much invested in the inventory.

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  8. That is absolutely fascinating. Although I'd sort of like to try the cheese myself and being dead complicates that! It looks like a charming village and a very interesting street. Oh, how I love cheese!

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    1. Part of me would go in a flash. To someone else's funeral.

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  9. Jeanie used fascinating. Right on. Love cheese I would rather eat it now. This is wild...
    ;-)

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    1. It truly is. Who knew there were places and cheeses like this?

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  10. Do they also age the biscuits for that long?

    God bless.

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    1. One would hope. Cheese without crackers is just plain wrong.

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  11. Never heard of this before, very interesting.

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  12. A fascinating practice, especially as the "owner" of the cheese will never get to taste it. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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  13. I wonder what it would taste like though.

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    1. If anyone could chop into it, it would be like trying to chip into a rock.


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  14. I've not heard of this tradition ... interesting.

    All the best Jan

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  15. This does sound kind of "cheesy" to me but hey, if you're dead you won't mind the stinky cheese! Nice way to get back at relatives that think you left them a huge inheritance!

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  16. I do hope to visit there at some point.

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  17. I don’t like cheese so having a dead cheese in my honor wouldn’t interest me. I’d rather wander down the quaint cobblestone streets and admire the geraniums.

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    1. Europeans enjoy red geraniums. Walking down those streets is enjoying history.

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  18. My goodness! What a remarkable concept for such a picturesque and inviting little village or town. (I couldn't decide which, as it reminded me of many villages in Galicia.) And what beautiful photographs. I love posts on travel, and so I am glad I discovered your blog. Thanks for stopping by mine and commenting.

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    1. What a place, for sure. When we visit our daughter in Switzerland, these little towns seem unreal.

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  19. I read this somewhere a couple of weeks back... I think the departed can have my slice.

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    1. I'll have them set aside some for us. We can take the 149 yr old wheel.

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  20. I wouldn't do this. But I'm pretty sure my wife would.

    Great photos!

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  21. I suppose it would be a good way of finishing off a few other people at your funeral if they ate the cheese. I'd rather drink a well aged wine.

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    1. If you settled for beer/ale, the cheese might wash down easier?

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!