Wednesday, December 9, 2020

God bless the Irish!

 


March isn't near yet, but  St. Patrick's Day should always be celebrated at any time of the year. Soda bread, Guinness, must be available at all times.

Ireland is more than liquids to imbibe. What has been an integral cornerstone in that country is its language, Gaelic (Gaeilgh). No matter what England could do or take away from the Irish, Gaelic was theirs and theirs alone.

In history, Ireland is darn bloody. From the north, the Vikings brutally conquered and generally settled into the country, especially on the Eastern coast and in the North.  Bloody, darn bloody. Oliver Cromwell was a master of creating rivers of Irish Catholic blood. 

The English, in their desire to "civilize" conquered the country back in the 1169 A.D., staying there until 1949, when some counties voted to remain with England and the other counties voted for independence. Northern Ireland is part of the Britain, but the Republic of Ireland is governed by elections. 

The people of Ireland are incredible, spending time and swapping stories with tourists.  The Irish are well educated, and speak two languages. Irish Gaelic is not an easy language to just pick up on the fly. From the first class (children of ages 4+) to adulthood, students are learning in English and Gaelic.  

Irish writers are renowned for their use of words woven together so tightly. The Gaelic united them in a way that is difficult to describe. It's unique and it's beautiful.  

Early on, England recognized how it was not just Catholic or Protestant, it was how Gaelic which was the glue for the people.  It was pretty savage on the part of the English---Children were beaten by teachers if they spoke in Gaelic. The effort to get rid of the language failed.

God bless the Irish.  Dia beannaigh an Ghaeilge



This 4 year old above is from Northern Ireland and the accents there are heavy. Not as difficult to understand as Scottish, but read the subtitles. You will enjoy how devoted he is to getting his work done.  I'm a busy mon.

WB Yeats is one of my favorite poets.  Just threw this poem in, the words mean much  to me





30 comments:

  1. Being second generation Irish on my mother’s side and 3rd on my dad’s, I know all about the William Butler Yeats’ first quote. My Irish family had/have a wonderful sense of humor while waiting for the sky to fall.

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    1. while waiting for the sky to fall! Well said.

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  2. I've liked Yeats poetry since I was a teenager. The Irish always had a wonderful way with words, both written and in song.

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  3. The one thing still on MY todo list is to visit Ireland. Mama says we are a mix of the Scot and Irish on her side, the Lloyds. Daddy had no idea the base of his family. But something has always 'attracted' me to Ireland. I was stationed with some Irish men, I loved the accent. The item is still on the list, but becoming more dim as the clock ticks.
    Loved it, the captions helped on the busy man, but I could still get the accent. Love it, THANKS
    Sherry & jack in a 'cool' Florida

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    1. Most 4 year old boys are thinking about Legos, but he is too busy with his list of chores.

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    2. You and Sherry would be awed by Ireland. Go, don't think about it. Just Go.

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  4. Being the mother of Irish children has deepened my appreciation for things Irish. Irish history is fascinating.

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    1. When my son came home from school in Ireland, he was furious with the English and what had happened with Cromwell. When I told him that that happened hundreds of years ago, he was relieved.

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  5. Have you noticed how the conquerors are always suppressing the language? It's repeated throughout history.

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    1. Cutting the roots of anything will kill it. That is what England tried to do.

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  6. This site truly relays how important language is to maintaining the culture.

    Go to this site: http://www.cultureready.org/blog/language-extinction-and-what-means-culture

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  7. The Irish are amazing. According to Grandma, there is Scots-Irish on her side, and i certainly hope so.

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    1. Most likely. The flood of Irish, Scottish, and English poured into USA during the early 1800s, and then in mid 1800s the Irish struggled to survive. I am a mixture of those countries.

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  8. I've made a couple of attempts at the Irish language, to no avail. It's totally immersive.

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    1. Our oldest was 10 when we moved to Ireland. Since she was that old, she was excused from the Irish. Its difficulty was too much for someone her age. The 6 and 4 yr olds did well.

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  9. Have you read Thomas Cahill's classic book "How the Irish Saved Civilization"?

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  10. He certainly is a busy little man, I understood him quite easily, about 98% anyway. I've heard Irish accents in movies and TV shows, that helps a bit.
    I had no idea Northern Ireland still belongs to England.

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    1. I could understand much of his speech as well. I was wrapped up in that precious serious face.

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  11. One of my daughters did an Ancestry DNA test and found she was 6% Irish/Scottish, she says that explains why she sunburns so quickly.

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    1. That dang fair skin! My eldest daughter also has that Celtic skin.

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  12. Have you read any James Joyce? Have you listened to The Dubliners? https://timeforreflections.blogspot.com/2015/03/any-irish-out-there.html

    God bless.

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    1. James Joyce was born in Cork City and his life in the North Cork City showed the impact it had. I tried to read it, really tried. But it was exhausting. No punctuation or periods.

      Dubliners was a collection of short stories, but I decided I would wait for a while.

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  13. When we first came here, I had a hard time understanding someone from Mayo but had no problem with people from Donegal. We are going to try taking an Irish class as soon as covid gets taken care of.

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    1. Excellent! Good to hear your struggles. One man from Northern Ireland visited, and honestly, I couldn't understand him. He had this huge moustache that obscured his mouth. So I couldn't try to read his lips.

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  14. it was painful to watch how conquerors try to erase locals and their language including all kind of identity ,i watched this in movies and shows like Ann With E on Netflix
    i so enjoyed the little master's seriousness lol ,he is so cute !!!

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  15. Soda bread yes, Guinness not so much. Definitely an aquired taste - which, in spite of growing up there, I never aquired. The Vikings didn't confine themselves to the north and the east coast. They also looted and pillaged in my hometown, Limerick, and in the immortal words of our diminuitive, stilletto wearing H.S. history teacher, 'Trixie,' (we only called her that behind her back) "became more Irish than the Irish themselves!" And absolutely Yes! to Yeats. Whenever I've been browned off with life or at a low ebb this is what plays in my head - " I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, and a small cabin build there of clay and wattles made...." You probably know the reast. I especially love the line about "...lake water lapping with low sound by the shore." Do they still make school children learn poetry off by heart? It was painful at the time but you come to be glad of it.

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    1. Oh, I wish I had memorized poems. The Vikings were rampant throughout Ireland.

      Soda bread and brown bread. I love brown bread, slathered with butter, and then spread with orange marmalade.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!