Saturday, October 5, 2019

Autumn from Back Where

This a maple tree outside Mom's kitchen window.
 Back in the Midwest, it was as if my world took a deep breath and said, "Finally." Then overnight my life would be surrounded by gold and red.  But now, my world is a desert in southern California and rich color exists in another place.

It makes me hunger for and a little bit jealous of “back where” there is such a thing as autumn.

Instead, we have wildfire season in California and the fall colors don’t exist, except for a few odd trees. What I do have are photos I took in late October 2009 on a walk with my brother, Don.  The photos taken were put into an album to give as a Christmas present for my mother who was in fading and failing health.

These are memories of Autumn and a small town, in 2009:

Tracks will go on for miles and miles, connecting
with other tracks.

An old house next to the bank

Mom's neighbor.  Mom could tell me who they are, who there parents were...

Small rental apartments next to the train track.  This
used to be a veterinarian office when I was young. 

A house near the local funeral home


After my father retired from farming, he visited with other farmers at the John Deere
store every day.  Sometimes he drove to another John Deere store to pick
up parts.  Now they are ordered and delivered through computer 
magic.

The Methodist Church from mid 1800s.  Young couples 
would meet on benches (out of sight) and talk/kiss.

This log house was saved and then moved to this site.  It dates back to 1820 
and across from Stark Nursery, where the first Delicious apples were
created by someone who brought up a "scion" from Kentucky which
was grafted and cross-pollinated.

This house was restored and is now occupied by some very hard working 
people whom my mom knew.  Yes, she could cite their lineage. We
stopped and peeked in the windows while it was still
under construction.  Mom had no shame, and was friendly with everyone, who 
also knew her own lineage.

This is a cornfield after harvest. Soon Canadian
geese will fly in to grab up corn kernels.
Deer will also be foraging.
Somewhere this road will come to an end.

These are Autumn memories from a past shared by my late Mom, brother Don, and me in 2009. My eyes ache to see the leaves and this part of my family, those whom I love.

A repost from 2014

50 comments:

  1. Oh yes, knowing and reciting everyone's lineage . . . typical small town living!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mom's family had lived in that area since the early 1820s, like the rest of the community. So they all know the lineage, and their secrets.

      Delete
  2. Hi Susan - such longevity in an area ... many of us still live in our family areas, yet others like more of us have travelled and wandered and experienced other lives. Yet the roads are long forever ahead, or in our little land often short and very winding ... always leading somewhere each season. The colours are coming here ... I'm glad I have seasons ... nostalgic memories of your mother and brother - cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I miss my mom. She died in 2011, yet I still want to call her.

      Delete
  3. I love your photos ~ great memories. We have a few vines and trees that turn colors during fall, and the most common is Aspen, with their beautiful golden colors.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I live in an area with four distinct seasons - for which I am grateful. Sadly fire is a frequent visitor here too and has already (in early Spring) wreaked havoc.
    Equally sadly, the city I live in is not a community. I doubt that there is anywhere where anyone knows about the lineage of their neighbours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Montana's population is abou 1 Mil. while Wyoming is about 300,000. Small towns and ranches mean that they know each other, but not the lineage, I am guessing.

      Delete
  5. Nice photos of old small town life. I'm grateful for the four seasons where I live.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for you! While winter might be miserable, the rest would be good.

      Delete
  6. I too like the changing seasons. This year they are not behaving properly. Before the leaves have turned it's so cold.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love your autumn small town memories. I'm not sure where it is but I have a feeling there are a lot of towns our way that look a great deal like it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope there are still some of towns that echo my memories.

      Delete
  8. Wonderful pictures. Memories are so important. A nice thing about our modern times is that we have pictures to supplement what we remember.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We can take pictures plentifully in these days.

      Delete
  9. Sure in full bloom. Many in a small town know the lineage of all. We get 4 seasons here, although these days some are shorter than other.

    ReplyDelete
  10. What a thought-FULL gift, that album! Take me home, country roads,....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh yes. Those country roads. Have driven on them!

      Delete
  11. The sweet nostalgia in your story is nice. I'm just the opposite. I have these memories, some of them very good (from growing up in Ohio), but I don't long to return. I spent time up north (Michigan) as an adult, and nothing made me long to return to a warm state more than those ridiculous, bitterly cold winters. I'm content now. More than... :)

    On a side note, I forgot about those sturdy handle bars on the old trikes!!! Today they break so fast, those metal ones lasted forever!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Phoenix, AZ has communities of "snow birds" from snow states. Mostly retired people haul their RVs or rent someone's trailer.

      Delete
  12. I get it. I love foliage season here in New England. It is, however, all too brief. Then winter is looooooooong.

    ReplyDelete
  13. That's very similar to where I live, but more picturesque. We had temps in the mid-90s until two days ago. Just now dropping into the 50s at night. It's been so dry, I don't think we'll get much leaf color. Probably go straight to brown this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll have to head to Idllwild ( mtn town not far from us, and hope to see some color. They always have lilacs, tho.

      Delete
  14. Now that's some old real estate.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Lovely memories for you. The very old and tiny log house looks like a toy from a "village kit"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does. It is a very small log house, about a big as most guest bedrooms

      Delete
  16. This is beautiful, probably because we are now in our 80's but still remember mama who KNEW the town. As a matter of fact my wife KNOWS this town (or did know this town before it lost its mills and became a bedroom for Charlotte next door.
    Anyway. I'm late, but love it. great read and pictures.
    LOVE IT
    Sherry and jack

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you enjoyed the photos. Mama always seem to know the town and its people.

      Delete
  17. Thank you for such beautiful memories through your past.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love thinking about those brief moments of fall.

      Delete
  18. Sometimes here in the swamps, where we don't have real seasons, either, i wish i could go visiting the places that do, just for a little while. Thank you, this was like a little visit to a special place.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is like a little visit, I never thought of it that way. Thanks.

      Delete
  19. We've had near 100's for the past couple of weeks. Today was forties in some places. I'm not sure we'll get the color we normally do in MO if we go straight to winter.

    Teresa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This area is having a normal autumn. Sorry about MO, maybe it will sneak in?

      Delete
  20. Nice to go back in time and relive those days!

    ReplyDelete
  21. I absolutely love these pictures! What a little spot of heaven!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hometowns always hold that special spot of heaven.

      Delete
  22. Hi Susan!
    First of all, I wanted to thank you for continuing to read my little blog. I always look forward to seeing your name there and I really do appreciate each and every comment. I know I reply on my own page, but I wanted to thank you in "person" (or as "in person" as we get in blog land!) Also, I'm sorry I haven't been by here in SO LONG. Ugh. Things tend to take over and I don't like that.

    I love this post! The photos and the memories. When I moved away from home, I thought I'd never, ever miss anything about middle Georgia. But I do. I miss a lot of things that come back to me when I go home to visit. I don't really ever want to move back to the metro-Atlanta area, but I do enjoy the memories that seep back in from time to time <3
    ~ Jen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jen! I am glad to see you name!

      The word "seep" is so accurate.

      Delete
  23. Beautiful post, Susan. And if you do visit Idllwild, say hello to Mayor Max for me.

    ReplyDelete
  24. lovely sharing from your previous town dear friend!

    this is so important to keep collecting such treasured memories through the eye of camera so we can scroll them down when they just pass away :)

    your captures are BRILLIANT and i enjoyed the sharing along with them
    your mom was so wise to treat everyone with equal respect and love ,this is truly a gift!

    ReplyDelete
  25. I have to honestly say that the few times I have returned to the small town where I was born I really didn't feel much of anything.

    ReplyDelete

Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!