Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Sliced White Bread





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Is white bread healthy?

There were two colors in Clara's rural county: white and tan .  And there were two religions: Protestant and Catholic. There were four Jewish families, all of which served an important role there: two doctors, two funeral directors, and a family who owned the main clothing store.

This had been the normal order of life for decades, but then it alllll tilted. Clara noticed that in 1964, as the two doctors were getting old that the balance of the county was changing.  

Two new doctors moved to this small sliced-white bread community, and they were not white or tan.  Dr. "Garcia" and family were from Mexico and, Dr. "Varma" and family were from India. While they all spoke perfect English, they didn't sound "right". Both doctors fared well enough, since they were needed and didn't offend anyone.

But, oh dear Lord. Clara realized that their children lived a solitary hell in school, play yards, and walking to and from school. They had no friends, except those who had been different enough to take the chances of being one to them. 

Clara reached out to the girls and created a circle of friends from her own. She was one of the "different enough" people and this group were ones who functioned at a higher intelligence level. By this time in their lives, Clara and her friends had spent their entire lives being a part of their own different world.

What ever happened to those children? Clara don't know. After they survived high school, those dear ones went away and didn't even return home.

Five decades later, Dr. Clara and her other Doctor friends returned to a class reunion. As far as they could tell, not much had changed.

This is a classic white bread recipe, and so easy! The loaves bake up incredibly tall, soft and fluffy... the perfect white bread!
Hmm...Good.


100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread
Whole Wheat. Is it really good for you.
<img src="pumpernickelbread.png" alt="Sliced pumpernickel bread on a wooden board">
pumpernickel

38 comments:

  1. Sigh. A familiar tale. How I wish we could/would realise that our differences are smaller than our similarities.

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  2. By now we should, as a world. But it doesn't seem to happen fast enough.

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  3. I read this, sneaking in time while covering a math class at a racially diverse school. You name it, they probably have a representative somewhere in the school. And there are all shades hunched over their books here right now. Things can change.

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    1. They can be, definitely. The discrimination is "under the radar" in many places. Now, there are more marriages and biracial children, which blends the community. things will change then.

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  4. This is so sad. So real, so true, so sad. I can't say much more.

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  5. Sad that's how it turns out sometimes.

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  6. Ahh, a familiar story from my youth. I was raised in a segregated world. Never attended school with anyone of another color. Church was a little different, but not much. Lines of patterns drawn by others hundreds of years ago ruled. Not so now in my town. We are certainly diverse. A friend and I were discussing this yesterday. No one can tell us things haven't changed for the better. Even the Dr. I selected is from India.

    BUT yes there is the nasty nature that is under the radar. It takes generations for real change to come about. Yes it is a shame, but at least, it will change...

    Love the post very good! THANKS!

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    1. Not every one has experienced this, or understand how this happens. It does take generations.

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  7. Like Jack, I was raised in a segregated, homogenized world. When my elderly mother first met her new doctor she was shocked, "He's BLACK!" (Actually, he was from India.) How far we've come … but how very far we have to go.

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    1. My father was in WW2 and spent time in India. While he admired the Singh group, he considered the others as "not right". Years later, my mom needed surgery to correct a bowel blockage. When Dad saw that the Dr. was from India, he refused to have the surgery done until the next day when a white surgeon was there.

      What can I say? Mom turned out okay, but she spent another day in terrible pain.

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  8. Not that this is really on point, but I eat whole wheat white... I've worked around blacks, latinos, Vietnamese, Thai, Burmese, etc. for years. I segregate only into dependable and lazy. That'[s the only important difference, and it cuts across all the other classifications.

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    1. Understanding the other races and cultures takes time.

      I don't usually eat bread, but when I do, it is brown bread packed with whole grains, fiber, and no corn syrup. Of course, I slather it with butter and orange marmalade.

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  9. Sad we still have so far to go these days

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  10. It seems we move one step forward and then two steps backwards when it comes to race relations. When I was young I thought my generation was going to change the world and equality among all people would be the norm. We failed miserably.

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    1. I remember times in college when we all talked about changing the world, what we were going to do when we finished there.

      I never saw or knew a black person until college. Strange, isn't it.

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  11. There was always the 'different' ones in school..I know cause I was one of them. We used to spend lunch time in the stair well closest to our next class comparing notes on various classes and topping up our homework. Without those guys I wouldn't have known what to do with myself.

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    1. So, we were fellow 'different ones'. We hung out in an English teacher's classroom.

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  12. Susan:
    ---I remember how things changed as well.
    Made some really great friends in high school, and they were NOT white. This was in the mid-60s.
    I was called quite a few "names" (by whites) because of my "choices", but that never stopped me from having lunch with MY friends.
    And I became a better person for sharing the experience.
    I had similar good experiences in my workplaces also.
    Race hardly mattered when compared to one's quality of.character.
    ---A shame that times have changed so very much.
    Our society could learn a lot from history...if it CHOSE to do so.
    Very good post and some wonderful comments.

    Stay safe (and pass the seeded rye bread) out there.

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    1. Yes, knowing and sharing experiences others outside our comfort zones changes who and what we are.

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  13. It is changing, and everyone who tries to be part of the change is helping, a little at a time.

    How i love our neighbors, who are very different from us. We learn a lot from each other.

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    1. Same here. In our new community, the variety of people is excellent.

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  14. Not much change in five decades? I've been away from where I grew up for about five decades and when I visited three years ago I didn't know the place apart from the street names and locations.

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    1. In my own community, it feels like there is glass dome over it and nothing really changes.

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  15. A very accurate depiction of small towns.

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    1. The irony is that small towns can be such lovely kind places, but still hang onto these 'values'.

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  16. This is both sad and beautiful, spot on and poignant. We need more Claras in our world, to be sure.

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  17. Dear Susan, you are such a proactive storyteller. That is, you provoke us into thinking. Thank you. Peace.

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    1. Thanks, Dee. I appreciate this coming from one such excellent writer as yourself.

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  18. I have always been fascinated by diversity, mainly I think because I am very curious. My schools however were totally segregated. The year I graduated, the nation got to see what hatred really was by the coverage of the "Little Rock Nine".
    I really thought things had changed till I moved from Florida to this lovely little town in the Ozarks. This is the whitest bread town I have ever seen. Sadly now days, I am startled to see someone of another color and know they are just passing thru.
    I do hope we as a nation can continue to grow and embrace.

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    1. Sigh. Somehow the South continues to be tied to pre-Civil war ideals, which extends to anyone of color. A niece lives in Atlanta and told some stories of discrimination. Pretty scary and angry.

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  19. People live in fear and when that happens, they get mean towards those who are different from them. It's sad but change is going to happen, it always does. Without change life would be boring.

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    1. Absolutely. Change will happen, and it depends how much it is embraced or rejected.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!