Wednesday, April 13, 2016

What's up with Education, anyway?

Futurama
Education is confusing at any school district, State education departments, and Federal over-sight committees.  Questions range all over spectrum, based on political interest levels.

 All the issues in education are based on Politics, and who controls the money.  No, really, it is just about the money.

Call me cynical, but educational needs reflect political hormone swings, a pendulum of sorts. 

CTEL2WordCloud
Language acquisition
For over a decade, bi-lingual education was the "flag pole to salute" (political term).  Teachers had the option to meet certification 1) take four college classes, or 2) take a test, essay and fill in the bubble.

This all earned the "B.C.L.A.D.**"certification. Not only that, teachers had a deadline of four years to complete this requirement, or face employment death. **Bi-lingual Cross-cultural Academic Development

It is very important here to acknowledge that the goal of every teacher, is to understand the needs of all students and meet them. 

In less than a year, a growing bi-lingual program was dismantled. Teachers were aghast--killing the sacred cash cow? Money moved to other programs.
  
Bubble in
No Child Left Behind--a national test given faithfully and funded by National funds--was part of the GW Bush legacy.  With this Standardized Testing, districts forced "teaching to the test" onto each teacher.  Nearly every day, students took mini-tests which would hopefully lead to successful scores, making school districts showing progress.


Product Details
Available at Amazon
Here is a preface from an 1889 edition of Illinois and the Nation. This book itself is as dry as sand, but it is an interesting view of expectations in teaching:




So many opinions, disputes, and frustration accompany this topic.  What to do?  What to say?  What to believe? What next?

What do you think? Did education in 1905 go the right direction?
What should schools be teaching in this era?  Are students basically the same, or radically different from students way back when? What should be done now?

My posts nearly always contain some sort of graphic or whatever.  It breaks up the solid wall of words.  When a student faces this wall, shut down may happen.  So, throw in some photos appropriate to text and allow readers to process, then read on.



23 comments:

  1. It is a bit harder now in a way, as there are cellphones, internet, etc. plenty of distractions. Then though you didn't have the knowledge we do now or teaching tools. Always positives and negatives.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very true---it is positive and negative. Teaching students how to use a computer is important

      Delete
  2. It's always good to evaluate the needs of the student. And teachers know they change from year to year! Districts should do the same.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. One year I had a delightful class--mixture of needs and cultures. The next year I had the class from hell; many students will documented behavior needs. And many students who were identified as low functioning. It was always that way.

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Kids are kids. One of my core beliefs is that we as a people haven't changed all that much. Just what we focused on.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think some children are well taught, but most are not. I do not know the solution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The solution is found at the school board, which is politically motivated.

      Delete
  6. Sadly not only is education frequently driven by money issues here it also gets onto trendy bandwaggons. Mantling and subsequently dismantling those waggons takes money too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those crazy bandwagons! So much money is wasted big time on theories de jour.

      Delete
  7. EC said it better than I could have. The trouble with all the constant changes is the text books become obsolete and new ones must constantly be bought. The children of families with low incomes suffer the most as books can no longer be handed down through the family. I remember getting second and third-hand text books right through primary school. Nowadays, every child starting school or beginning the next grade must have new, since the previous year's books are useless.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here everything is provided by the school: crayons, pencils, erasers, paper...Books, too. When they are deemed out dated, out they go. Not given to the children at all. These books are stacked to either be taken to recycling. I have raided those stacks, since those books were fine. Distributed books to students to take home.

      Delete
    2. Free school supplies, the one thing I like about America. And one more thing, print out sheets for assignments. Our kids have to lug around heavy bags full of heavy books.

      Delete
  8. Just wanted you to know that I was here and read this with interest. Since I wasn't born here and I have no kids, I don't read much about what goes on in the schools here, but I have read that teachers often spend their own money on books and supplies. And I did watch The Wire, where the season that depicted the schools in the poor neighborhoods of Baltimore, was something never to be forgotten.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If such could be added, every teacher spends at least over $1000 on the classroom. I did. Around March, the supply room was nearly empty of every thing. Requests for more came back with the answer that funds were depleted. Families did not have the extra money to donate, so...

      Delete
  9. Not really sure the students themselves are radically different. The respect they display certainly is though (not all student, def. a lot of them) and not in a good way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Society rules were different then. Parents expected children to be respectful. Now, rules have eroded.

      Delete
  10. Being a teacher these days would be brutal. I respect the brave souls who do a remarkable job even through the government mandates bull.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The news tells of horrors in the classroom. I retired 8 years ago, gladly.
      Charter Schools are growing at wonderful rates.

      Delete
  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I teach English in Germany, and I can attest that the needs of the students should come first, second, and third :) luckily it is not as bureaucratic over here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Political Correctness changes everything in education, everything!

      Delete

Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!