Monday, February 1, 2016

History of...what?

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History books from the 1950s and 60s were thick, really thick.  History of the world affected every nation, making knowledge vital to the next generations. From Julius Caesar to Jesus Christ to …. Every huge event was an essential domino.

That made History granite, words carved in marble, embellished with gold…immutable.



Now, as an adult, I am viewing history in a different light:  potter’s clay.
  
History is ever changing.  An archaeologist's dig in Italy reveals the ancient worship of deities and everyday lives.  Another dig in Montana discovers layers in stone, showing what happened that killed the dinosaurs followed by great volcanic deposits.

Archeologists have been left scratching their heads
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Another Planet? Apparently Pluto may be forgiven, while a ninth planet has been discovered.  The Universe is expanding, which is contrary to Einstein's view that it will shrink.

Genomes?  DNA manipulation?  None of this was part of history until recent years.

One wonders: with all these new world events, what will be discovered beneath layers and layers we leave behind, in a dig buried below time, hidden in rock?

Everything we thought we knew changes; new discoveries aborts old reasoning and shapes the lump of clay in a different direction.


26 comments:

  1. A thousand years from now, they will dig up a box of Twinkies. And they'll still be edible.

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    1. They will also find a box of Little Debbie's white cakes. I mean, they need to have a choice.
      But, the twinkie thing has been tested, and it is scary.

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  2. History was taught as dates, battles and rulers when I was at school.
    And ignored so much that I think is more important - how the 'average' person lived, and what geographical challenges shaped us.
    The twinkies comment is scary. And they probably will be at least as edible as they are now.

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    1. History is in the people and their lives, along with some scary geological events.

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  3. You're right; history used to be that thick, immutable book. Now all the other ways to consider an event bubble to the surface.

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  4. I'm hoping 100 years from now when the predictions at my blog come true, questions will be asked. Who was Spacerguy? Fascinated, the supreme Humanoids of the Galaxy will want to resurrect me.

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  5. Yep, what we think we know can change easy as can be. May find the hole to the center of the earth lol

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    1. I wonder if I will every see stuff like that?

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  6. Yup, look at how much phones changed in a short time.
    I saw a group of kids looking at our old land phones and they
    had no idea what they were. ( And I don't understand the
    iPhones they use all the time.) Haha

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    1. I have an old touch button phone (beige) w/cord to speaker and a jack to connect to the wall. Land line in its purest form.
      My gr-child has helped me with apps on cell.

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  7. Yup. And what we think is important changes, too. So, while the old history books talked about wars and great men, great women and great people of color now occupy pages about changes made in those eras.

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    1. And it all mixes together (hopefully, not forgetting the older events) to give a view of the world.

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  8. The history of the world will be written on something smaller than a pinpoint on something that we can't even imagine today. It won't really matter though as we never learned from it anyway.

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    1. My daughter(1966) told me that WW2 was covered in 2 pgs.

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  9. I love archaeological digs. I've never been to one, but have seen plenty on TV. The things that get found are amazing; even more amazing are the found things that give answers to previously unanswerable questions.

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    1. I am right there with you, brushing and scraping! Life led in another direction.

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  10. Always learning. Who knows what we will discover next.

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    1. Between looking skyward or looking into finest genomes, something will be discovered!

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  11. Hi human, Susan,

    I totally dig your fascinating, insightful pawst, my kind human friend.

    Pluto must be reinstated and with the mention of that other possible planet, that would make a total of ten.

    Pawsitive wishes and doggy kisses,

    Penny xx

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    1. Seriously, Pluto showed itself to be more than just a gray rock far out. Astronomic world should be ashamed!
      Thanks, Penny. You and your human Gary always delight me.

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  12. An interesting thought, Susan...we make history..and in some place some humans want to tear it all down and tear it into pieces.

    It does make one wonder what generations in the far distant future do discover about our present world.

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    1. Some want to delete the "guilty parts", wiping out those events that show the crimes of humanity.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!