Friday, October 9, 2015

WedWords: Marching Home

Bibury-Gloucestershire-England-1
Source
When Hitler threw open the gate of war, he had no doubt that his enemies would blunder and fumble through years of ineptitude.  A game to him, Hitler watched and waited.

The small village of Cranville-off-Trent lined the streets as their own brave boys set off to war.  Tears, so many tears dropped onto the cobblestone street where their sons had walked.  Come home!  Write!

At the "River and Trout" where publican Jim Garvey served many pints that day, he listened with equanimity and compassion for his patrons. Many pints over days, months, and then years were served, as Jimmy comforted despondent friends, waiting for their boys. 

Slowly, brave boys returned home, one by one.  Grieving parents, whose sons lay in graves somewhere, cheered for each young man.

A pint of beer outside a pub
source


Jim served many pints each time.  And he always poured a pint in memory of those who did not march home. Here’s to ye, brave lads.  God love ye and keep ye.

Two words sent me down this road:  publican and despondent.  We knew many publicans (pub owners) in Ireland, all good kind souls.  Most of them did not drink.

These bold underlined words are compliments of Elephant's Child for Wednesday Words.  Please click on her site, sit back and enjoy.  E.C.'s blogs always provide beauty and interest.

And....please look at the random words and take some time to write anything that inspires you!

18 comments:

  1. War is never good for anyone. Bet a lot of pub owners served a lot during such times

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    1. The pub always had a radio which announced war news and played music. It was (still is) a gathering place, only with big screen TV on which to watch the latest football/soccer events. Many pints sold.

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  2. Imagine a world without war.....I guess that would be heaven.

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    1. That sounds like a John Lennon song to me.

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  3. This is, as always, beautiful and moving. Thank you.
    And, while I appreciate the nudge, this month I can claim no credit for the words. They are published at my site, but were provided by Margaret Adamson and her friend Sue.

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    1. I will stop by their site and make apologies.

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  4. What a wonderful tribute. War is never pretty but I respect deeply those who have served.

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    1. While we hate the war, the warriors must always be honored.

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  5. Love the atmosphere of the pub, but can't drink the beer! :)

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  6. I could picture your story and a sadness came to my heart.

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    1. Have you ever seen "Mrs. Miniver"? One of the best movies ever about how war affects a town and a family.

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  7. A sad story. War is never a good thing.

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    1. Some days the words head me down one road, others down another road.

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  8. A beautiful story, somewhat sad too, with lives lost.
    I love the image of the row cottages.

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    1. So much history in those row cottages.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!