Monday, October 26, 2015

Time to Walk Away

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Yes
Time comes in all lives when a person says “That’s enough…I’m done…”  Turning off the tractor, closing the grade book, handing over the keys and walking away.

Teacher friends of mine taught for forty years, forty years!  I think of their names and see them in my mind.  Some took that long desired cruise, some moved away from the desert climate, and some, oh those teachers, got sick.

One of my friends retired on a Friday and developed shingles on Monday.  If you do not know what shingles are, look it up.  You have no idea how AWFUL this is.

Another precious friend was diagnosed with breast cancer.  Since her breast cancer was genetic, she had a double mastectomy, chemo, radiation, and then developed uterine cancer.  A wonderful teacher, dear friend, and school board member, she died.

Enough.  There are many stories, good and bad.

Point of this post:
 
Recognize it is time to stop, to walk away.

You know when it is time, you can feel it.  Do not deny the hip, knee, or shoulder.  Do not ignore pain or sense of exhaustion.

A number of issues forced me to retire, a good ten years early.  And then the same issues that drove me during some mighty fine teaching years had followed me home.  An severe elbow injury and serious migraine inheritance---I try to ignore them when creating a project.

But, paying attention to the signs and pain taught me to stop, leave what I was doing, and walk away.
Time to Let Go?
Let go
How about you?     


26 comments:

  1. Very sorry about your friend.
    Know when to hang it up. Who wants to retire and live the remainder of life in misery?

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    1. On Fri, there was a sense of relief and rejoicing. When Sun. evening came, we all had a let-down.

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  2. Very true. It was time to focus on me and ditch the 9-5 for a while, my body couldn't take the crap any longer.

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    1. Injury at school + migraines closed the career for me. Know when to stop, know when to hold them...

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  3. Didn't quite quit soon enough sadly.....

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  4. I quit weaving when I needed a new hip, and didn't get a new loom for almost fifteen years. Sometimes I want to walk away from raising children--again--and I cannot.

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    1. The children are from your heart...you'll never regret that.

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  5. 7 years ago I found I could settle a retirement income equal to my salary and was therefore working for free. Still, it was several months before I resigned --such a huge adjustment.

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    1. With your talent, I would imagine you could shake up a few things.

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  6. Just today I was wondering about a teacher who had to leave her job in the middle of last year. I wonder how she's doing. Yes, one must know when it's time to walk away.

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    1. Hope she is well...
      Knowing and following are sometimes hard.

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  7. I am so sorry about both your friends. Two vicious illnesses which don't disciminate - except they often seem to target the most precious people.
    I am not good at following my body's advice. Sometimes to my detriment. Sometimes refusing to listen to it keeps me connected and allows me to achieve things I thought were beyond me. I wish I could tell which was which.

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    1. You and me, both. Fortunately, God's voice in my head says STOP and I say "You're right, God."
      But, I still wish.

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  8. Are you thinking about walking away again? From what, pray tell, and where would you go? Please forgive me if you have already answered these questions in the comments. I am resisting reading them to save my eyes from some strain.

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    1. No, I am in a good place of retirement: being with gr-kids, reading books for enjoyment, writing, sewing...all the activities I could not do while teaching. Good place.

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  9. Yep. I knew it was time to let go of my job when I realised how many pain killers I was taking daily just to be there 4 hours a day.
    I walked away and now take 99% less medication.

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    1. Sounds like a good decision, probably difficult to make initially.

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  10. "Time to walk away" 4 little words packed with meaning!

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    1. Such meaning...when I said that aloud, it was like the clouds opened and God's rays of light showed down.

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  11. I intended to work longer as I liked my job, and loved most of the people in the small family run company. However, there was much going on in my life and I was in and out of the hospital with stomach problems brought on by anxiety. I went into work early one morning, my boss was there and came over to chat. Without planning to do as so, I told him that I would be retiring in six months. With a heavy heart, I did just that with some regrets but also with great relief. It was the right thing at the right time.

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    1. When you suffered so much, it definitely was the right decision to make.

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  12. I am glad to read that you are enjoying your retirement, but sorry about your friends. Sometimes, for some people, retiring is the end, suddenly. It is as if working was what kept them alive. I find this sad, and I feel they are robbed of an afterlife, in this life. I have retired from a proper job a few times, and found another lifetime to enjoy. Change is as good as a rest. x

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    1. That is so precious, esp. the last sentence "Change is as good as a rest". Thanks, LeeAnn!

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!