Friday, July 31, 2015

Wed.Words: Dysart, Louisiana

People sit on a bench along the seawall in the storm surge from Isaac, on Lakeshore Drive along Lake Pontchartrain, as the storm approaches landfall, in New Orleans, Tuesday, Aug. 28.
southeast Louisiana
When forecasters warned that Hurricane Banning would be making landfall in just a few hours that morning, parishioners of St. Mark Catholic Church dropped everything and sprinted to the Church.  All recognized how fragile the old church was.

Even the normally dysfunctional people drinking at Lucy’s Bar and Grill loped over, with fry-cook Big Chris moving with rare alacrity. 

The Baxter family unloaded sheets of plywood, planks, and boxes of nails as the community arrived.  Without speaking, it was understood that the multi-paned, mullioned window overlooking the altar was primary to protect.
 
The colored glass, brought to the Parish from France in 1781, was invaluable, a true treasure to the people of Dysart, Louisiana. Even with the church boarded up, still none knew if it was enough.

Hours later, when the wind had carried the storm away, parishioners hurried to see St. Mark’s.  Viewing the structure even from a distance, all gave thanks, even Big Chris. 

Seeing the Altar and precious window intact, it did not matter that much of St. Mark’s lay in ruins.

Every Wednesday, River posts 6 to 12 words to be used by any blogger who wish to enjoy a break from the serious stuff.  Use these words to write fiction, prose, poetry, flash fiction, etc.  Either post it on your own site and link it back to River's delightful gentle stream, or make your addition to her blog site comment section.

The bold words above are this week's words.  Hope you enjoyed how they were used.

Also, many thanks to Delores at Under the Porch Light who started this writing stir up, and to Elephant's Child who took up the slack when Delores' computer went all wonky.


Go on, with it!  Fling yourself out into the unknown!


29 comments:

  1. I know many have to prepare for hurricanes. I am glad they know in advance We have much less of a warning with tornadoes and little you can do except seek shelter. Wonderful story.

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    1. The coast areas have experienced many hurricanes, know to pack it in when the alarm sounds. I didn't think about those further inland.

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  2. Its always a great thing to know in advance so as to prepare.

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    1. If I lived there, I would store up supplies, try to get ready. But even then, hurricanes seem unpredictable in their damage.

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  3. I much prefer hurricanes to tornadoes. Little or no warning for the latter. Hurricanes you know about for days ahead.

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  4. Some things sure hold more value and need to be protected. Hurricanes sure can wreck havoc

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    1. Historical places are vulnerable to that damage.

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  5. Mere threats of a hurricane have the power to move many of us with "rare alacrity"! I'm glad the mullioned window survived the elements, including the wine in excess in the systems of the rescuers.

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    1. Wine, vodka, whatever--Lucy's Bar and Grill serves it all.

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  6. Sounds like the people were okay too, and that's really the most important thing. :)

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    1. Saving lives are certainly primary.

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  7. How nice to hear that Hurrican Banning cooked up a community from normally dsyfunctional individuals. Hard times can do that...

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    1. Well, had to work in those words somehow...

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  8. I certainly did enjoy how these words were used. I like the thought of a town pulling together to save something that means a lot to them. Perhaps the church will be rebuilt much stronger now.

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    1. With modern building mat'l, it should survive another 2 hundred years.

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  9. Seems to me a hurricane area would be a good spot for underground housing, much like the dugouts in Coober Pedy here, where the opal mines are. It's too hot to live above ground there.

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    1. The best place for a hurricane is upland, away from the rain and wind. I would not live in a hurricane zone ever.

      We often considered building into a hill with one side facing the south. Never happened.

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  10. I always love to see what stories you come up with using the words from this challenge. Great read as always.

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    1. Thank you, Julie. Your site always proves good reading.

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  11. Tumultuous weather can leave some real oddities in its wake.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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    1. With modern radar readings, residents have a great amount of warning to leave. And the houses with boats in the garden certainly is an oddity.

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  12. Well, at least the windows were saved. Now to rebuild a more sturdy church.

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    1. I am positive the next storm will not find the church to be so easily blown down!

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  13. Ah, semi-happy ending. I liked the rhythm and feel of this one.

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    1. To have the bitter and the sweet after a hurricane is desirable.

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  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!