Monday, June 1, 2015

Succulents hold the secret of water...


This is the fourth year of the California drought.  Too many photos show the Central Valley—the home of huge fields growing every fruit and vegetable imaginable—is starting to look like a waste land. 

We rejoice for the rain that is beating down on other places, and are appalled at the floods with its unrelenting damage.

Selfishly, I look at the flowers on Elephant's Child site and sigh at their beauty.  Cup on the Bus is surrounded by flowers, plants, and green, so green.  There are other blog sites who post such amazing photos of their world.


Well, now.  The only way I could show any photos at all was using my cellphone to capture succulents at a local Succulent show.  Here are some beauties, and I don’t know their appellations:

<==This seriously could be used as a back drop for a C movie.

The plant to the right is
some sort of bonsai; do not
know what kind.  Do you?==>

This plant might actually survive with my ineptitude?
<==

I was told this plant to the right is called 
"pitcher plant" or monkey's paws.  It
has a sweet nectar at the bottom of the 
pitchers that traps and consumes insects.==>
If you have suggestions, please
write them in your
comments!  Please?

Perhaps you all may know these amazing plants' names?





<==I love this one!

31 comments:

  1. My mother had the one on the bottom a couple houses ago. I never knew what it was called.

    I managed to kill a cactus once. Not on purpose, of course.

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    1. You are a talented plant killer then! Cacti are resilient plants. I have two that I have ignored for years...yet they still grow. Amazing.

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  2. What amazing pictures.

    I wish you rain.

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    1. We need rain so badly. Watching the Texas floods and wishing it could be channeled over to us, I daydream.

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  3. Sorry can't help either. Here in Ontario we have also been crying out for rain and I am delighted to say we finally got it this weekend. What a pity we can't all share each other's rain or sun, whatever is needed.

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    1. Last winter when the East was buried under the snow, we wondered how to pack it into a cargo plane.

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  4. Those are some weird looking plants!
    We're good on rain but I feel for those in Texas.

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    1. I posted only the strange ones. The others looked pretty normal.

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  5. We've gotten rain here, so everything is green. Hopefully plenty of it drops at your scene

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  6. I am saddened by California's drought. I remember my mother telling us how fortunate Ohio is, with its access to the Great Lakes, because water was second only to indoor flush toilets in her perception of the state of civilization.
    That last plant is a succulent I know a burrow's tail. I considered putting some in the flower tower.

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    1. Those would be lovely against flowers of color.

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  7. I hear you. We have had droughts here too. And another is threatened. Droughts which laid waste not only to the gardens but also took out far too many trees. And by so doing threatened the lives of the birds and other wild life. And we still never, ever have enough water. A truly precious resource.
    There are a LOT of pitcher plants. Fascinating things. I love your succulents too, but am clueless about their names.

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    1. I hope our citrus trees can survive another summer of drought.

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  8. I use some cacti in my gardens and besides not needing very much care or water, they are lovely. The third plant is a variety of Echeverea, and the one you love is Burro's Tail.

    We have been without much rain this spring on the east coast but there is hope for some this week. However, they told us that last week and all we got was one hour of light rain.

    We are all concerned about CA's drought. It is a terrible situation.

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    Replies
    1. The Central Valley and its vast production of food will be missing this summer. Food prices will be up.

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  9. Don't know all their names, Susan, but I have a couple in the dining room and they last for years. Still trying to set up my blog on my website, no luck so far, need my grandson to add a code, but no reply. Shall let you know, and thanks as always for your kind support.

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    1. I advised my aunt (who had tried to set up her computer) to get one of her teenage neighbors to come by. He and his brothers have no fear, and always make a computer happy.

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  10. After 5 years of drought, we are happy for the rain here in Texas, though the devastation in some parts (not where I live) has been terrible. Even with all that water, the drought is not yet completely broken in my neck of the woods. I hope California gets rain soon.

    I think that last succulent is called Donkey Tail. And the one above it and the pitcher plant looks like a variety called Hens and Chicks.

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    1. I hope Texas has reservoirs that filled up with that rain.

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  11. I'm good with animals. Plants, not so much. The ladies in my home like them, though.

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  12. Third photo is aeonium, they come in several colours including black, I plan on planting a few (giving up on flowers, just too hot in my patch). The one you like, in the pot, with hanging trails, is one of the sedums I believe. I may be remembering wrong, but my mum used to call this donkey tails I think. The variety of sedums available is quite large and I'll be looking into those as well as several other varieties.

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    1. .Thanks for the info! I will be going to the local nursery to buy some succulents, and this sounds very helpful

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  13. Echeveria has smaller fatter leaves, does look similar to aeonium, but aeonium grows taller, while echeveria stays small and grows rosette shaped then has baby rosettes around it later, these can be broken off from the base and replanted.

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    1. Sounds like my kind of plant.

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    2. There is a huge variety within the echeverias and so many other succulents available. Get a book and choose the ones you like best. Learn their growth habits and plan a rainbow garden.
      Aeonium; Cotelydons; Crassula; Echeveria; Euphorbia; Graptopetalum; Kalanchoe; Mesembryanthemum; Sedum; Senecio; Sempervivum.
      All have several colours available and when they flower are pretty spectacular. Some don't flower. Some have plain or frilly leaf varieties.

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  14. Thank you as ever for your kind encouragement, Susan. I wonder if I may add you to my list of newsletter subscribers? It is once a month and always very brief :0)

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  15. Succulents are such cool looking plants. And they're hard to kill. I have jade and aloe. I'd love a monkey's paw/pitcher plant. I did manage to kill a bonsai, though. :( The other great thing about succulents is that you can easily propagate them from a leaf. Well, aloe propagates itself and you just have to pull it when it has separated from the main stem. Super easy.

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    1. I think I am ready to head to the nursery. Shannon provided a great list, as did River. So, we'll go out and pick out some.
      Thanks to everyone.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!