Wednesday, May 27, 2015

So far away

File:World Map WSF.svg.png
I'm in the northern yellow, Mary is in the green
Living 12,000 miles away from my daughter sometimes hurts so bad that my shoulders droop and my heart breaks.  So far away, I am not there to teach her many things that my mother taught me: history of Mom’s adventures, stories from my childhood, how to make a pie—and, not there to rock her little boy and sing him songs my mother sang to me.

So we watch that little boy Benjamin play, talk, cry, and grow up over the computer and hear how our daughter Mary is doing in Switzerland.  

Recently she stepped in a pothole while crossing the street, fell and twisted her ankle.  Benjamin looked down at her right next to him, still holding his hand.  He moved so he could sit on her lap and pat her shoulder, and hug her.  It’s alright, Mummy.  It’s alright.

Facebook is good as a tool to see what they are doing.  Richard, Mary, and Benjamin went to a petting zoo recently, where the goats received more than they deserved, bags of goat feed to buy; those goats were well padded.  He patted their furry goat butts, and gave them all the love and smiles that weren’t mine.




To be so very far away and watch a two year old become a three year old is a year he grew up and I grew older. 


Dang it.

19 comments:

  1. Life can be and is so very hard to bear. I'm having more and more work, looking after my husband, not finishing my books, so for a time I shall only be updating Facebook, doesn't take long, and the main update shall be on my Website. Take care, Carole.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Knowing how busy your life is now, I appreciate your stopping by! I will be stopping by your website!

      Delete
  2. I always stayed close to my mother and appreciated all she did for me. I think of Europeans and English and Irish who must leave home to find work and wonder how they keep in touch. Although I also smile at English who drive two hundred miles and call it a day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The 1848 Potato Famine was desperate in its family break. But they did write and eventually bring others over to America.

      Delete
  3. Has to suck being so far away indeed. But at least we have things like skype these days, helps a bit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only I could reach through the screen!!

      Delete
  4. Families always find a way to keep in touch. For this generation, it is skype, email, tweets, instagrams, facebook.

    That does it . I am writing a letter today to my far-away kids. And I promise myself that I will do this regularly!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm really sorry. I'm sure that's how my grandmothers felt when we lived in Japan for several years.

    ReplyDelete
  6. But it's amazing how much you can see via the interwebs. Yes, it's hard to be so far away, but think to what it would be like if all you had were intermittent phone calls and mailed pics.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is exactly what I had to do when my children were little. Every letter meant so much and the rare phone calls were to be treasured.

      Delete
  7. Definitely bitter-sweet. Sooooo much better than the days when a letter took half a year to arrive, but that aching void which can only be filled with arms, and cuddles and smiles is still there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We found a letter dated 1838 from the Kansas homesteads, that had fallen down from the attic to the bottom side boards. I wondered at the time how long the letter to reach its recipients.

      Delete
  8. I know how you feel as 1/4 of my family lives across the country and I only see them one or two weeks a year. You eventually get used to it and accept it, but the hole in your heart never goes away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. True--we never get used to it, but our time on line, facebook, or Skype is precious.

      Delete
  9. He's a gorgeous little boy, fast leaving the baby behind.
    My own grandchildren live in the same state I do, yet I barely see them, they're all so busy with school and work. They grew up in the blink of an eye it seems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I see that with my two gr-daughters. We were at the hospital the day they were born, held them from day one, and now they are doing the eye-roll thing. They live about 30 miles away, so we see them quite frequently.

      Delete
  10. Dear Susan,

    My lovely friend, I totally understand your post. Benjamin, your daughter, all your loved ones so far away. Thankfully and partial consolation, we have the magic of the internet to make the wanting of our loved ones seem not quite as painful.

    So far apart, so close together.

    Hugs,

    Gary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have some dragons ready for tomorrow. He'll like them! I like them too.

      Delete

Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!