Wednesday, November 5, 2014

The Waves of Triggertreeders


Source: Wave after Wave
Halloween is over…Praise be to God.

Starting at 6:00 pm, they came in waves: low tide, heavy surf, high tide…

Little princesses, little super heroes with proud parents holding them…Shy, little first-timers are so shy.

Mixed in the low tide were toddlers and pre-school delights, walking uncertainly to the door.  “Tank you…”
The golden delights (eight to twelve yr. old) boldly stride to the door.  “Triggertree” they said, with their plastic pumpkins held out.  Parents waiting on the sidewalk talk and look at the watches.  “Thanks…” Parents smile and wave.  Some respond to a sign on the door.

Heavy surf.  

Teenagers charge the door, running from house to house.  Demand Triggertree!”  No parents this time.  Should have been, but no.

Shock hits when they see the bold sign:  No Adults or Teens‘But I’m…I’m…only …ten. Hands, feet, and teeth always tell the truth, and they walk away.

High tide.  

Huge vans pull up under the street lamps, offloading streams of parents and kids, all ages, people not from this community or even this town.  These  triggertreeders are out trolling for more candy.  Exhausted children are dragged along with these adults who expect to harvest the candy.

This neighborhood is mostly retirees. The cuteness factor of the low tide is what matters.


Oh-God-Please!-not these!  Time is 8:25, about ten minutes to lights off.  

Hoards hit the door, but brake to read the signs: 

Candy is for children only; No Adults and Teens; and, Donate to Wounded Warriors (with a five-gallon water bottle, containing change and dollar bills).

Parents, dressed in tutus and ghostly sheets, are confused. Small kids step up “Triggertree”, holding out pillowcases, heavy with candy.  Most said Thanks.

Teens announced they are twelve—nice try.  One tall boy looks confused; he doesn't speak English.  ‘Say you’re twelve’ he is told, but he announces ‘diaz’. No.

Only one little boy asked about the signs.  “Candy is for children only…candy costs money…can’t afford it…” he is told.

Finally 8:35 pm arrives.  Signs come down. Lights go off.

The water bottle holds more and more dollars, more change.  From which wave?  It did not matter.


We collected about $125.


The waves settled into calm water.  Praise be to God.

What do you think?  Check out these sites:

 Are adults too old to go trick or treating alone, without children?

Is there an age at which an adolescent should stop trick or treating?

27 comments:

  1. Your picture didn't come though on 'this side' sadly.....your Halloween night reminds me of what it used to be like around here when we first moved in. Such pure greed boggles the mind. I remember when we used to go as kids......three or four houses we went to alltogether,,,,home made fudge and cookies and caramel apples. We always went in and visited because of course we all knew each other. Halloween has not 'evolved' it has 'devolved'.

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  2. It has become such a greed-fest Get more-get more..was what we saw. So sad, frustrating.

    Which foto did not come through? I will have to see what went wrong.

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    1. It was the photo of your collection jar but it's there now.....

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  3. The adolescents are caught between children and adult stages. Entirely unpredictable. But they probably have way too much sugar in them. We don't have adults coming door-to-door, except with their children. They DO get treats, along with the kids.

    Blessings an Bear hugs!

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    1. No man's land is the adolescent age. What I would recommend is to go to the church "Trunk or Treat" where the trunks are games and candy is freely given. The charm part of Halloween is gone.

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  4. Kids should go and have fun, but late teens and adults? Pffft yeah right.

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    1. I love the children who go out with such excitement at the novelty. Things get jaded as the years pass by.

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  5. To the dismay of my granddaughters, the cut off age for me is twelve. The greed thing I think they brought along from their mother, who is/was a morbidly obese adult trick or treater. The peer pressure/bullying is rather significant, too. I dislike this practice, which simply displays the worst of the majority of people on the sidewalk.
    Finally, we as the adults in charge fail to recognize sugar is the gateway drug; it is as addictive as heroine. I could go on and on, but it's time to stop and be happy again.

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    1. Sugar! It is truly a gate-way drug to diabetes. I think the solution is to agree upon a limit on how many houses. And I think the candy should be divided into fourths. 3/4 should go out to a charity collection, and 1/4 kept.
      Stop the craziness.

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    2. To commenters: let me know if the last photo can be viewed, please! I used my phone, and I probably didn't do something right! Thanks.

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  6. Replies
    1. I think for teens it is a challenge: how much can I get?

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  7. That's cool you got so many donations.
    I think kids can trick-or-treat through grade school. Once they hit Jr. High/Middle School, then they are too old.

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  8. Your photo DID come through. And I love, love, love the idea of collecting as well as giving. A reciprocal agreement. And I am very pleased that so many of your visitors DID reciprocate.

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    1. That was a wonderful feeling, exactly what I was hoping.

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  9. Its cheeky when adults and teenagers show up. Halloween is meant to be a fun festive occasion for kids to be spoilt. We had about 30 in all shapes and sizes stopping by.

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  10. We do the trunk or treat at the church. That makes me less weary about the candy content. My son's candy will sit until Christmas anyway... he likes to eat a piece or two and then he forgets about it. No grouching from me over that one. :) Glad you got donations for a good cause, that was smart thinking.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! We used to do the same with our own kids' candies. Same result.

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  11. Eleven or twelve should be the limit I would think. I guess I trick or treated until I I was 13, but I was a late bloomer in a way. Things seemed more innocent back then too.
    We keep our house dark on Halloween these days, but this year it didn't matter once as it rained most of the evening. How strange for Los Angeles. That was the trick on everyone.

    Lee
    A Faraway View

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    1. Rain on Halloween must have been devastating!! Oh well.

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  12. Adults go trick or treating?? Are you kidding me? That's wrong.
    Triggertreed is for kids and I think they should stop at about 12-13. Toddlers in costumes are so cute.

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    1. Oh, that is the only reason we get the candy ready: to see the little ones in their costumes.

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  13. We have so few trick ir treaters -I give to any and everyone that knocks-cool fund raising idea!!

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    1. I didn't know how it would go. We have yet to count, lots of change.

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  14. What a great idea asking for donations for Wounded Warriors! I'm impressed with how much you collected! It was very quiet by us on Halloween. It even snowed here for a little while.

    Julie

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!