Wednesday, August 20, 2014

War of the Words, again



Confusion reigns/reins

Words are train-cars.  One leads to another.  

Then it blossoms into some other word that confuses the heck out of Third Graders already caught in the web of the Anglo-Saxon confusion.


AND THEN

there is always the homophone dilemma of many other words:

lone/loan; rough/ruff, some/sum. gym/Jim... 



Just some entertainment if you'd like...

Enough of this.  

Can you add to this crazy theme of confusing words?


Can you stare/stair at the bear/bare and spit in its face?

Give it a chance; add to another word train wreck. 

I know I have written a similar post a few years ago, but hey/hay! It is August, it is hot/haute.  There/their are/our to/too many, so/sew many blogs to read/reed, and so little time/thyme.  

This one is for you, Gary!

16 comments:

  1. What if someone had a flair for flares?? That'd be funny. Well probably not funny. But still.

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    1. It is funny, altho forest fires might be a problem....

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  2. Dear Susan, your posting so wonderfully illustrates why English is one of the hardest languages to learn . . . or so I've been told by a linguist. How about that sentence? We have "dear" and "deer." "so" and "sew" ( as you pointed out in your last paragraph). "Been" and "bin." "by" and "bye." Do you see anymore? Peace.

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    1. There are so many, and students were so frustrated. Harder still for 2nd language students.

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  3. It's a hard enough language for those born to it...imagine coming to this country and trying it out as a second language?

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    1. So very hard. I still see the confusion.

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  4. thrown, throne, I know as I messed up way back when, so many of them, Whoever invented English needs a swift kick haha

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    1. Thrown off the throne? Now that could be useful for your posts.

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  5. There and their. I see those messed up all the time.

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  6. Two, to and too. Weather, wether and whether. Such a rich (but sometimes frustrating) language.

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  7. Faze and phase. The reason we have so darned many sound alikes is because English borrows from many other languages, so the homophones have very different origins and meanings. I do feel for ESL learners!
    I will likely resurrect my Phonics Friday posts in September, in which I cover homophone pairs and trios (poor, pore, pour for example).

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    1. It is all the fault of increased travel in the far-back of human existence.

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  8. Well my kids have trouble with the whole 'omb' problem while reading. Its hard to explain to first graders that they have to say bomb, comb, tomb, womb in different ways. Bleh!
    Raquel Byrnes

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    1. ...and dough, though, enough, rough, thought, bought, ...

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!