Friday, April 25, 2014

Heart Heavy, the Letter V





Vietnam Memorial, Washington, CD
                                     


Jay Shelby

There are some letters, some words, some places that are painful to think, imagine, or to speak.  This is one of them.


The Letter V is for Vietnam
William Peyton

Joseph Michael Williams

Jay and Mike were from my hometown
of 427.
  
William was my cousin.

They were all so very young.


And we all know of someone who had gone to Vietnam.
  


When no photo was available, this
took its place.

When you meet a Vietnam veteran, greet them with thanks and kindness.
For them, Vietnam never ended.

Vietnam is for the Letter V

In our town of 427 residents, five young men died.  In our small rural county, full of farmers and hard-working people, over 100 boys died horrible deaths.

21 comments:

  1. The Memorial in DC is very powerful. My father served in Vietnam and fortunately returned alive.

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  2. My brother in law did two tours of Vietnam (he was drafted the day after he graduated from college, but went on to make the US Army a career. Hence the 2nd tour - it gave him "an opportunity to lead.") He never has anything to say about it at all, but I know it weighs heavily on him at times.

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  3. Can't even imagine what they had to go through

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  4. Ooph, this is a tough one. I'm sure the loss is felt especially hard in small, close-knit communities like yours.

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  5. I love this post. I am always reminding my girls to have respect for the men and women who went to fight for this country. I don't ever want them to take for granted, what someone else sacrificed for them. It is a very powerful place to visit, and must see on every American's list, if you ask me.

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  6. Several people have remembered Vietnam today.

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  7. Did any of the boys pictured here come home?

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    Replies
    1. No, they did not. Jay died in 1968, as did Mike. William died in 1970.

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  8. V is also for vicious, which the war surely was. V is for vociferous, which the people were.

    Such a very sad, sad experience!

    Blessings and Bear hugs!

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  9. We have a profound respect for our military in our home, with several family members including my husband and our oldest son having served, or actively serving. I can't imagine it being any other way, though I know that not to be always the case for everyone.

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  10. There are no winners. And yes, it is indeed a heavy, heavy word you have for today.
    Hugs.

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  11. We will remember them in our hearts.

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  12. I think we always need to respect our veterans and our military, which is not always done these days. Vietnam was a watershed for our country. And we need to always remember their sacrifice, that is also not done always. Thank you for remembering.

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  13. Losses like these are never easy, will never be easy. My heart goes out to you.
    My cousin, like a brother to me, served proudly. Volunteered. Was a Marine. Earned 7 (that's right seven) Purple Hearts.

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  14. Where have all the young men gone?
    Gone to graveyards every one.
    When will they every learn? When will they ever learn?

    Ans: Not in my lifetime.

    Beautiful tribute to those young men.

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  15. All wars are awful, but Vietnam seemed to be more so somehow, made even worse by the returning soldiers not being greeted and recognised as the WW1&2 soldiers were. There wasn't any help getting them reintegrated into society either. They just came home and were expected to get on with life as they had before they went. As if nothing had happened. Shameful, shameful treatment of young men who had lived through such horrors.

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  16. A sad but beautiful post. Thank you for writing it.

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  17. I can understand young men (now also women) going off to war as when they were drafted in the Vietnam war. Although I'd head for Canada because I don't consider my life being a pawn for some gangster politician's narcissistic ego. I realize todays independent contractors of the military make the really big bucks and that is the allure. Everyone knows it's not to save American the beautiful any more and is there such a thing as a real patriot?

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  18. Beautiful tribute, Susan. Yes, we should always keep them in our hearts, and always remember their sacrifice on our behalf.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!