Wednesday, October 30, 2013

Horseman pass by

travels-ireland-sligo-dublin-elsinore-yeats-05
Under the shadows of Benbulben
The Balloon of the Mind
Hands, do what you’re bid,
Bring the balloon of the mind
That bellies and drags
In the wind,
Into its narrow shed.
Wm. B. Yeats 



2 glasses of wine
Source: wine as medicine
A Drinking Song
Wine comes in at the mouth
And Love comes in at the eyes.
That’s all we shall know for truth
Before we grow old and die.
I lift my glass to my mouth,

I look at you and I sigh.
Wm. B. Yeats
                                                               
William B. Yeats—always a favorite of mine.  

26 comments:

  1. The balloon of the mind...off on one of its many trips to who knows where.

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  2. Yes, wine does make love easier in good and bad times - especially the bad times. Ice cream helps also.

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  3. Love the sight of a balloon over fields, the mind drifts wit them. Wine, and chocolate?

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  4. I LOVE Yeats. My favorite is He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven.

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  5. Grab the liquor and it might cure a bicker. Could be good for the ticker, but too much and you'll get sicker

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    1. Fly up high to see the sky. Drink the wine for a fine time.

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  6. How have I missed the first Yeats poem all my life. What beautiful pictures you selected.

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    1. The first poem captures my brain on many days.

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  7. Love it - though I am happy to let my mind run free. It usually comes back to me (eventually).

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    1. If I am lucky, my mind decides to settle down.

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  8. I wonder if it’s possible to fly away in a balloon with a glass of wine in your hand. Now that would be something, wouldn’t it?

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    1. Some people have gotten married in a balloon, and then serve wine/champagne. It must be quite an experience.

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  9. This is the sort of poetry I don't understand. Maybe if I took it line by line several times, but I have other things to read.....

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    1. Yeats is an acquired poet. Not everyone sees his wry Irish-ness.

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  10. Dear Susan, I so like Friko's comment! She's always so wry. And I like Yeats' poetry. So you're given me here double pleasure on this rainy morning in Missouri. Thank you. Peace.

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    1. Oh, how I would love to see the rain in Missouri, with the trees in color!

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  11. Greetings Susan,

    Such wondrous images are conjured. I float away and with the wine of content, I bid thee cheers.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny the Jack Russell dog and modest internet superstar! :)

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    1. And to thee, dear friend. The winds of cheer and thought aid the drifting through time.

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  12. "The balloon of the mind" is a rather strange phrase. In fact you may have to excuse my ignorance if I say I'm not sure what this is about. I'm picturing someone taking some sort of mind altering drug, but it the case of Yeats making more like alcohol. And what is the "narrow shed"? I guess with more thought I could come to a better conclusion.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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    1. As I interpret it, the "narrow shed" is our own skulls/minds. My thoughts drift and wander, and I constantly have to re-focus. No drugs or wine--just day dreaming.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!