Friday, September 20, 2013

Yellow Sky

unreal part1 26: sky of planet Orbottyan
Source:costiq
Dan watched a mustard yellow sky and listened as sounds of birds silenced.  Rain had been pelting grain fields hard the past few hours with wind sweeping across the farm.

He had always been known for his honesty and degree of readiness in storms like this.  The last time the sky was yellow and the air heavy, Dan recalled how specific he had been about getting the family to safety, telling them what to do when the tornado touched down. 

Back then the funnel had lifted his heaviest truck and ripped the bottom carriage right off, flinging it to the neighboring farm.  Tornadoes flagrantly pass through, shredding a life’s work in a matter of seconds.

Dan watched for Jenny and the kids, praying for them to be safe.  As he headed to the shelter, the old Toyota tore into the drive.  “Now!  Get in now!”


Dan wrapped his arms around Jenny and his children in the shelter as the roaring monster touched down.  “Safe. Safe…” They all prayed.

Bad Weather: Storms and tornados killed 3 last night in Texas.  I waled outside and caught this picture before running for cover.
Source: Photonut

Many thanks to Delores @Under the Porch Light  for her challenging words.  Please please please check her site for other participants in her Wednesday Words.

Tornadoes are horrific terribly destructive monsters of nature.  Many fellow bloggers have been affected by them.  Always pray for those in the path of a tornado.

27 comments:

  1. Mother nature isn't very nice some days

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    1. Tornadoes express nature's incredible power.

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  2. The mustard yellow sky was evil looking. That story plays out every year in tornado alley. Great use of the words.

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  4. That is very powerful writing, Susan!

    Blessings and Bear hugs, for you and those who face tornados!

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    1. Thank you, Rob. I lived in Illinois and watched those skies. Now I am in California.

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  5. Glad we don't get them around here, they are something to fear

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    1. As a child, tornadoes were fierce monsters that roared north of our farm.

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  7. Dear Susan, you are a born storyteller. With a few words, you use your great talent to give us characters and plot and drama and suspense. Outstanding! Peace.

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    1. Thank you so much, Dee. In the Kansas City area, you must have faced those storms.

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  8. That is an amazing image, and the words made me shudder. Nature is indeed powerful. x

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    1. I've always had a healthy fear of tornadoes.

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  9. The writing is good, it made me cringe. My husband has a really healthy fear of these storms and is very cautious with us. I laugh at him, but it's not a bad thing.

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    1. Thunder and lightning storms were pretty common in our part of Illinois. But, go 15 miles north where the plain lands stretch out? Different story altogether.

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  10. Wow. I so admire the use you make of the words that Delores teases us with. Some of us (me) play frivolous and trivial games, and you produce writing of power and depth. Thank you.

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    1. Thanks, EC! Sometimes my mind comes up with strange things. This time "mustard" headed me the serious road.

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  11. An excellent story. I'm so glad I don't live in a tornado area.

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    1. You and me both. I live near an earthquake fault. In our 25 years here, we have had only shakes.

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  12. Wonderful piece Susan.
    We've never experienced a tornado this end of the globe... well, not that I know of...

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    1. I wonder? Do tornadoes occur down under?

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  13. Have seen some movies on it, but the actually experience of it must be totally shattering.
    Well written.

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    1. I don't think anyone will ever forget the tornado that destroyed Joplin, MO. Or the ones that headed through Oklahoma this year.

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  14. When I lived in the Midwest, I remember watching one cross a field a couple miles away. It's a sight I won't ever forget.

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    1. No, I don't imagine you will. Terrifying.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!