Friday, June 7, 2013

Who Was She?



Who was she? 

Susan slowly unfolded the unfinished quilt in Grandpa’s Antique Store and then gasped.  An experienced quilter would have to gasp at this rare find; no other response would have done it justice.

Fabrics from seven decades flowed along carefully stitched seams.  Curved elegantly and precisely pointed, this simple quilt top spoke of its creator. 

Tiny even stitches...

Who was she?

Flipping the pieced fabric revealed tiny even hand-stitches, done patiently and without hesitation.  The knots were tight, almost invisible.

“Look!” Susan called to her husband, who was handling rusted knives and axes.  “See this!”  She ran her fingers long the flowing ‘Apple Core’ design. 

“Uh, huh…” John answered, glancing briefly at the cascading fabric.

Carefully planned color flow...See how the points meet and the line travels ...

“See how she considered the colors and the designs!  Pink moves to pink and gray floral, moves to gray and blue, then to blue and yellow!  It is…”

But John had moved on to bronze casted statues.

Who was she?  How could she ever let this go?  Who would dare to give it away to be sold?

Pink floral, to pink, to black to blue...So much thought was given to this...

‘Forty-dollars!  Only forty dollars?’ Susan gathered and reverently folded the quilt. 

Forty-dollars for a masterpiece. 

The masterpiece is being quilted by more capable hands than mine.  In a few weeks, I will bring it to my home.

19 comments:

  1. A work of love should be in the hands of one who will cherish it.

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    1. It is unimaginable to me that anyone would put this in a consignment antique store.

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  2. I'm no quilter but it seems to me that those curved lines would be much harder to piece. What a great find.

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    1. Yes, it would take some skill to do it well.

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  3. As my sister says, some one's grandma in heaven is very happy and telling the other grandma's "Look, look, someone found it and is taking care of it."
    That is some incredible work. Each little piece was traced around a template and cut out. My mother made many quilts of that type.
    Great find, Susan.

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    1. It has been completed by the quilt store, and awaits to have the binding. In July sometime, I should get to it! It is lovely.

      My grandmothers made quilts like this. I can still see one in my mind, sitting in her rocker and patiently sewing paper onto fabric, and then tearing it away.

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  4. Sometimes all in takes is caring and at the price tag you'll be staring, in a good way.

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    1. Thanks, Pat. The caring part is the hardest for many people.

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  5. I loved this post... History...

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    1. The fabric is incredible--from the 1930s to the 1970s, maybe further. History, indeed.

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  6. Beautiful quilting but so few people care. We all know "who she is." She is an old quilting lady who died and none of her kids appreciate quilts so it was sent to the thrift store to be taken home by someone who really appreciates it. I know. It kinda rings a personal bell.

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    1. I hope others realize that the old quilting lady has so much yet to share. She is a treasure, one who creates gold.

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  7. Yay Susan,

    Nothing like a bit of quilting. You do remind me, once again, of the time I attended the "Comedy Knitting" workshop. Had me in stitches.

    A good weekend to you, my friend.

    Gary :)

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  8. Piecing curves is (politely speaking) very, very challenging. I undid seams often and often when I tried - and my piece was not completed with anything like the skill, style and panache of your incredible find.
    Drooling from afar.

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    1. Looking forward to posting some photos when the binding is done. Such a treasure.

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  9. I have never seen curves like that in a quilt. It must be difficult to make. I would love to see a pictures of the whole quilt. I see that you will do that soon.

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  10. Those points and lines...such precision! I've never heard of an apple core quilt, I wonder if the stitcher lived on an apple farm? she must have had enormous patience to be able to stitch so delicately. It's beautiful. Will you be showing it to us again once it is quilted? I'd love to see.

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    1. Inger and River:

      Those curves and lines, perfect points, are extremely difficult. They require patience and skill, which I don't have in abundance.

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Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!