Wednesday, March 6, 2013

This was the preferred reading book for children at one time.




A book makes a stamp on the reader’s mind. 

A good book will remain in the reader's mind. 

A great book may make a change in the reader’s mind.  

An amazing book will remain in the reader’s mind for the rest of his life, changing the way he perceives the world.

As a proponent of quality young adult books, I firmly believe that even the earliest children’s books must reflect that same expectation.  Children must experience truly good books in order that they grow to appreciate truly amazing books. 

from Wikipedia
Beatrix Potter brought a shift in children’s books, which were virtually non-existent in the 19th century (heck, for that matter, in any previous century).  She insisted that her books be "child-sized" for small hands to hold.  Ms. Potter knew her primary audience were children.  Say “Peter Rabbit” and most people know its source. 

What quality book from your youth affected you?  In what ways?  Can you suggest books (picture, chapter, poetry, etc.) that you hope would qualify as good/great/or amazing?

23 comments:

  1. I wouldn't say it was a QUALITY book but the hubs and I have never been able to get Dick and Jane out of our minds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Dick and Jane with Spot and Tim...I learned to read with those as well.

      Delete
  2. Although my parents were not well educated, they read me stories every night. I loved Peter Rabbit. I heard it over and over. I loved all the nursery rhymes too. There began my relationship with books. When I learned to read, I discovered mysteries and the Nancy Drew books. It was the great depression and everyone was poor but those who loved reading, were rich.
    Great post, Susan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I consumed Nancy Drew and Cherry Ames (the nurse series) as well. Then my grandmother gave me Little Women. After that, I read everything.

      Delete
  3. As a shy child I found it hard to express emotions and make friends. A wonderful English teacher helped me through books. She taught me abut friendship and sacrifice through Charlotte's Web and The Velveteen Rabbit. I've never forgotten the teacher, the books, or the inspiration. Minerva ~

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Such great books. Both are written so beautifully, and grab readers. Velveteen Rabbit had such amazing descriptions.

      Delete
  4. Well I think you can guess what books I liked as a child haha and yeah should be good so they search for the same quality all through life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm, Pat. Now you have me wondering.

      Delete
  5. I was the original tomboy, and devoured Joseph Altscheler's (?) frontier chronicles. The adventures of Henry Ware, frontiersman. In retrospect, there were no women, only brave men who settled the early frontier--from the Delaware Gap to the Ohio River. But, the history was impeccable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The women were right there beside the men, only they were wearing skirts, raising babies all by themselves. The men were out having normal adventures, but the women! Oh, those women were settling a nation.
      I loved reading about Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett, but Marie Curie and Florence Nightengale were also my heroes.

      Delete
  6. I used to love Nancy Drew. She looked for adventure and was a heroine to all us little girls who grew up in the 50's.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nancy Drew was my hero as well. I wanted to solve the mystery of the Clock Tower!

      Delete
  7. I was raised on (among other things) the Just So Stories, by Rudyard Kipling, read out loud to me by my father. The rhythms (I want to say lyrics) are with me still, even when I've forgotten the stories, and other stories. I am afraid to look at them now, because they're probably offhandedly racist. But the music remains.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My grandmother gave me her copy of Rudyard Kipling's book. I read it and reread it. Sure, it reflected the times. But it is also timeless.

      Delete
  8. Hooray Murr. I was also brought up on the Just So Stories. And before I was five I could recite great slabs of (you guessed it) The Elephant's Child. Those stores with animals in them are not (on the whole) racist. The Cat Who Walked by Itself is more than a smidge sexist, and I still appreciate it. Beatrix Potter. Alice Through the Looking Glass. And many, many more...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Cat Who Walked by Itself is my favorite story! I used to have a picture book back in the 90s, which I read to my students. Beautifully illustrated, and the rhythm of the words...

      Delete
  9. i loved petter rabbit and lots of other fairy tales--some of which, may be politically incorrect today---interesting topic!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't it!? Nancy Drew may be P-I-C, as well! Why should it matter? Books are reflections of the time in which they were created, so let's read all of them.

      Delete
  10. We are blessed with so many children's authors of the late 19th and throughout the 20th century, Susan, aren't we. In June, I am giving a series of talks on the invention of childhood, (i.e. the move from religious instruction to the idea of the child with it's own needs), and the various writers from this period. At the moment, I am collecting as many children's books from this period, and its costing me a fortune! The earliest I've been able to obtain so far dates from 1820; fascinating and weird in its religious fundamentalism.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would imagine the cost!! Am looking forward to hear about your series of talks! Post them, yes?

      Delete
  11. Yes, I'll post them for you. At the moment, I'm publishing the sequel to Candle Dark, it has to be available by the 30th June. Thank goodness the talks are in July!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I loved the OZ books. And Anne of Green Gables. I'm sure there were actual children's books I loved, but I can't think of them right now.

    Shannon at The Warrior Muse

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My daughter loved Anne of Green Gables at age 9. My son loved The Hobbit at that age, too. So many excellent books to choose from!

      Delete

Go ahead...it won' t hurt...I'd love to hear what you think!